St Paul’s Mission Kettle Falls

When our friends from the coast, Bob and Jan, came to visit last week we took an outing to see this historical site and to walk through the museum.

You can find some history of this area here.

History of Fort Colville can be found here.

“This grooved boulder was a favorite whetstone used by generations of Indians who camped at the south end of the fishery. Left there by the last glacier, it is made of amphibolite, more fine-grained than the local bedrock. The stone has been placed here in the same position in which it was used to sharpen the spear points, knives and other implements used to harvest the salmon.”

We stopped in to the museum and I only took a few photos.

While our friends were here we enjoyed a couple meals out and some meals in. By far the favorite meal was at El Ranchito where we were treated like royalty…again. We had lots of good conversation and relaxed time together. We said goodbye on Friday morning and after they left our little grandson was dropped off for a play date with Baba and Gramps while big sister went to a Preschool/homeschool co-op for a few hours.

More to come from our time with JJ.

Colville Historical Museum

Before too much time slipped away I wanted to go back to our time at the Colville Historical Museum and document what we saw here.

In 1975 the City of Colville entered into an agreement for the Historical Society to manage a piece of property and buildings it had received a decade earlier as a gift from the Keller Family. The terms of the gift is that the house and grounds were to be used as a park and museum. That had not been possible for the City prior to 1975 so the partnership turned out to be a good one.

We made a last minute decision to visit the Museum the last Friday of September and we were pleasantly surprised at the great indoor and outdoor displays and history. The Stevens County Historical Society has done an exceptional job! We had the grounds to ourselves on this afternoon and the museum volunteer treated us to a nice tour of the Keller House while we were there.

We hope to return to the museum next year (they are open from May-September) to take more photos of the Keller Home on the property. You can read about it here. During the Christmas season they decorate the home and have Christmas tours. This year because of COVID they are only decorating the outside of the home and will have live Christmas music drive by tours available.

This is the music room inside the house.

One of the views from the Keller Home.

The history of mining in Stevens County is great and was the lifeblood of the area in the early 20th century.

The exhibit that the Historical Society has developed comes from several of the important mines of the area. It has a 16 foot gallows for lowering a “bucket” into a vertical mine shaft complete with steel bucket. This was powered by a gas engine but the Society will have on display a horse—powered winch too.

This Trapper’s Cabin was moved from the John Lockner property on Gold Creek by members of the Stevens County Historical Society. The main cabin of a trapper was known as the “home cabin”. All of the furs trapped were brought back to the home cabin for stretching and fleshing the skins. A marten or a bear line could easily cover 12 miles. The trapper would cover these lines daily, packing his traps and about 20 lbs. of bait. Bear, marten, lynx, fox, coyote, beaver and other small meat eaters were plentiful for the trappers.

You can read about the farm equipment housed on the grounds here.

The first public schoolhouse built in the city of Colville was originally located on the south side of town, close to the city park. It was later moved to First Avenue and Elm Street, eventually making it’s way to the Keller Heritage Park. It was built in 1874 by local labor, including that of John U. Hofstetter, a leader in civic and educational endeavors.

You can read about the Heritage Park Schoolhouse here.

HOMESTEAD CABIN

Throughout the last half of the nineteenth century and during the early part of this century, small farmstead cabins dotted the countryside in all areas of Stevens County. Attracted by the availability of land, fine climate, a rich volcanic soil and scenic beauty, the early settlers cleared their land to build small hand-hewn log cabins. The farmstead cabin was donated to the Stevens County Historical Society from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

A closeup of the construction of the cabins.

You can read about the Hixson Castles here.

So much history preserved in our little town of Colville. We were impressed with all the well managed and documented information housed on these grounds.

As we drove away from the museum I had to jump out of the car to capture these turkeys sitting on the fence.

Happy 150th Birthday Canada!

Click over to Mennonite Girls Can Cook blog to see a wonderful tribute posted by Judy.

May the friendship between our two countries last forever.

The plaque says: “What an object lesson of peace is shown today by our two countries to all the world.  No grim-faced fortifications mark our frontiers, no huge battleships patrol our dividing waters, no stealthy spies lurk in our tranquil border hamlets.  Only a scrap of paper, recording hardly more than a simple understanding, safe-guarding lives and properties on the Great Lakes, and only humble mile posts mark the inviolable boundary line for thousands of miles through farm and forest.”

“Our protection is in our fraternity.  Our armour is our faith. The tie that binds more firmly year by year is..

…ever increasing acquaintance and comradeship through interchange of citizens and the compact is not of perishable parchment, but of fair and honorable dealing, which, god grant, shall continue for all time.”

Erected by Kiwanis, international in memory of a great occasion in the life of two sister nations here on July 26, 1923.  Warren Gamaliel Harding twenty-ninth president of the United States of America, and first president to visit Canada.  Charter member of the Kiwanis Club of Marion, Ohio, spoke words that are worthy of record in lasting granite dedicated September 16, 1925.

I’m headed out for a walk this morning with the Wonder Walkers. It will be a fine distraction from the tedious work to restore many of my posts. Hope you all have a good first day of July.

San Fernando Cathedral – San Antonio

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The 18th-century San Fernando Cathedral is the first church built in San Antonio, the oldest standing church in Texas, and one of the oldest cathedrals in the U.S. It’s listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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A copy of Michelangelo’s Pieta.

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It is disputed whether the remains of some of these Alamo heroes are entombed here but they are honored here.

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I’m linking up to InSPIREd Sunday with Beth and Sally.

When I uploaded my photos I noticed that my lens had a hefty smudge on it. This was a hot muggy day so it’s no surprise my lens got smudged. This was my last stop on the trolley tour and from here I walked back to the hotel. I visited another church in San Antonio before we flew home that was a beauty. I’ll share that one next week.

Friday was a banner day for exercise at this old house. After Zumba in the morning I mowed our yard and the front yard of our neighbor. During this time Dear and our son in law continued the work on our front walkway. (collage below) In the evening Dear and I took a walk since we were falling asleep too early. Today I might just be sitting around doing nothing until the Sounders game tonight.

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The walkway work will continue on the next dry day we have.

Hope your weekend is going well…

This Time Around…

…we decided on more coverage.

After our deck gazebo demise we’ve been considering new options for our deck and how to get protection from the afternoon sun. Here’s what we came up with…

Joshua came over to help his father and I got to lend a hand here and there. This wouldn’t have been as easy without Joshua’s help. Thank you Josh!

We are on the same wave length as the Space Needle make over for the 50th anniversary of the World’s Fair with Galaxy Gold…

We’re calling our color terracotta and that’s the color of our new deck stain.

Here are some interesting facts about the Space Needle…

When the Space Needle was built in 1962 it was the tallest building west of the Mississippi River.

The Space Needle had the second revolving restaurant in the world. The first one was in the Ala Moana shopping mall in Hawaii (now closed). There are now hundreds of turntables throughout the world.

One of the best sellers during the fair was a Needle-shaped gold charm with a light in it, selling for about $75 in 1962. Another was a 9-inch high chrome lighter in the shape of the Needle.

The center of gravity for the Space Needle is 5 feet above the ground.

The original nickname of the Space Needle was “The Space Cage.” The original name of the restaurant was “Eye of the Needle.”

We had so much fun in the sun over the weekend and we are still promised a good stretch. It was timely to get the deck structures up. Have a great week everyone!

Parish Church of St. Helena ~ Beaufort, S.C.

This wonderful old church and graveyard were around the corner from our lodgings in Beaufort. I enjoy historic places like these and we had some time before our lunch after Graduation and decided to take a stroll.

The Commons House of Assembly, under the Lords Proprietors of Carolina, established St. Helena’s in 1712 as a colonial parish of the Church of England. The church was built in 1724 and is one of the oldest active churches in North America. Construction of the church building was delayed by the Yemassee Indian War of 1715. Built of brick, much of which originally was ship’s ballast, and smoothed over with stucco, the church has excellent exterior proportions and fine interior detail. More of the history of this church can be found here.

 

 

We stepped back in time as we wandered around the grounds.

Back to the Present…

 

One of the Mennonite Girls calls this fresh love. I think that’s a great description. Isn’t it sweet to see?

 

My Beaufort posts are winding down. I’ll be posting some of my food photos and some photos from the Bay soon.

If you missed my post yesterday Andrew and Katie are now engaged….

Photobucket replaced all my photos with ugly black and grey boxes and they are holding my photos hostage until I pay them lots of money. I’m slowly going through all my posts and trying to clean them up and replacing some photos. Such a bother.

The Rhett House Inn

Over the next few days I will chronicle our trip to South Carolina. We left Seattle at 7:00 am and flew through Dallas and on to Savannah. From Savannah we had a 45 minute drive to Beaufort, South Carolina where we would be staying. We stayed at the Historic Rhett House Inn. We arrived at the Inn at 6:30 in the evening.

 

We stayed in room #7 on the lower level of the beautiful old house.

 

 

This garden space was just outside our door.

 

Located in Beaufort, South Carolina, the 17 room Rhett House Inn is a classic restoration of 19th century Southern Antebellum architecture. Offering all of the amenities that seasoned travelers have come to expect from a fine bed and breakfast, this historic Beaufort Inn is among the finest accommodations on the southeast coast. The Rhett House Inn is situated in the historic district of Beaufort, SC, a small Southern town of only 11,000 and founded in 1712, and only steps away from the celebrated shops and restaurants.

We got settled and walked a couple blocks to Emily’s for dinner. We were tired from a full day of travel and it was nice to sit down to a good meal. We enjoyed our food and the waitstaff were efficient and helpful with questions we had about the area. On our way home from the restaurant at dusk Katie commented that it felt like she was on the Pirates of the Caribbean ride at Disneyland with the crickets chirping, the muggy air, and the Spanish Moss hanging from the trees.

Over the next week I’ll be posting more photos from the Inn and the Beaufort Area along with the main event, the Marine Graduation Ceremony at Parris Island. It was all amazing. We arrived home on Saturday and during our layover in Dallas we enjoyed an hour with my brother and my niece Miss Hope. I’m still recuperating and hope to get around to visit y’all soon.

Photobucket replaced all my photos with ugly black and grey boxes and they are holding my photos hostage until I pay them lots of money. I’m slowly going through all my posts and trying to clean them up and replacing some photos. Such a bother.

Felton Covered Bridge

When we traveled to Mt. Hermon, California for Ben and Kristin’s wedding we were surprised to see this great old covered bridge in Felton.We were early for the wedding so we took some time to walk across it.

 

Built in 1892-93 and believed to be the tallest covered bridge in the country, it stood as the only entry to Felton for 45 years. In 1937 it was retired from active service to become a pedestrian bridge and figured prominently in many films of that period. After suffering damage in the winter storms of 1982, it was restored to its original elegance in 1987 using native materials and local talent.

 

Plaque is located at bridge entrance on west bank of San Lorenzo River in Covered Bridge Park.

It was a desire of mine to see a covered bridge and I was happy to be surprised by this one. I’d still be interested in seeing some more on the East Coast.

I’m going to add this link to Outdoor Wednesday hosted by Susan at A Southern DayDreamer.

Photobucket replaced all my photos with ugly black and grey boxes and they are holding my photos hostage until I pay them lots of money. I’m slowly going through all my posts and trying to clean them up and replacing some photos. Such a bother.

Pink Saturday ~ Olivas Adobe Bougainvillea

It’s time to visit Beverly at How Sweet the Sound to see lots of pretty pink!

 

If you’d like to read about this historic site you can click here.

Photobucket is holding all my photos from 2007-2015 hostage demanding a ransom that I can’t afford. So frustrating as I try to clean up my posts and delete their ugly squares of black and grey off my blog posts!

Southern Methodist Episcopal Church ~ Ventura

This Historical Landmark Carpenter Gothic church was built as Southern Methodist Episcopal Church in 1888. It was a wedding chapel for some time and was converted into a B&B and now it’s for sale.

On one of our Saturday walks in Downtown Ventura, California we decided it deserved a look see. The church is on Main Street.

These handles look like coffin handles to us…

So if anyone has $1,750,000 and wants to run a B&B this could be the place for you!

Photobucket is holding all my photos that I posted on my blog from 2007-2015 hostage and replaced them with big black and grey boxes with threats. So discouraging…as I’m slowly trying to clean up thousands of posts!