A to Z Challenge ~ C is for Colville

C is for Colville. Colville is our newest hometown. We’ve lived here since September 2018. Between hubby and me our first 37 years we lived in Los Angeles, Orange, and Ventura County, California. Dear and I were both born in Los Angeles County. We lived our years through high school and college in Los Angeles County. After we were married we ended up in Orange County where our first two children were born. Before we moved to Washington State we lived in Ventura County where our daughter was born. Our next 30 years we lived outside of Seattle in Washington State. And now for our retirement years we are living in the outskirts of the city of Colville still in Washington State.

Here’s a little history about Colville:

The first white man in the area that is now Colville was David Thompson, who came in 1811 to explore the Columbia River for the Northwest Fur Company. A few months later a water route was opened from Astoria up the Columbia through Canadian waters, and overland to the Great Lakes or Hudson Bay. During that first year, nearly 11,000 pounds of furs were reported shipped to the fur markets of London from the Colville area.

In 1825, Fort Colville, named for Lord Andrew Colville, a London governor of Hudson’s Bay Company, was built at Kettle Falls, a few miles west of Colville. The fort functioned as the center of trade in the Northwest. A large farm supplied wheat, oats, barley, corn and potatoes to sustain the personnel at the fort. (Today, both the fort and farm sites are under water, covered by Lake Roosevelt, a part of the Coulee Dam National Recreation Area.)

By 1840, the Hudson’s Bay trading post was processing 18,000 furs a year. When the boundary of the northwest was drawn at the 49th parallel in 1846 and the territory of Washington was established in 1853, Hudson’s Bay Company, being a British company, withdrew from Fort Colville and moved to Canada. The War Department in 1859 ordered a military post built just northeast of the present townsite. The post was called Harney’s Depot at first, then Fort Colville. Four companies of the United States Infantry were stationed there. (This second Fort Colville, located at different places at different times, sometimes confuses visitors.)

The town of Colville was founded in 1882 when Fort Colville was abandoned. The first school, a hand-hewn log building, built shortly after the founding of the town is presently located at the Keller Historical Center within the city limits.

Colville is the county seat for Stevens County. Stevens County is a county located in the U.S. state of Washington along the Canada–US border. At the 2010 census, its population was 43,531. As of July 2018, the population was estimated to be 45,260. The county seat and largest city is Colville

These are backyard views of our Country Bungalow in Colville, Washington. We do not live in the city limits of Colville so we don’t have the same services that the City of Colville offers within the city limits.

Colville is a city in Stevens County, Washington, United States. The population was 4,673 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Stevens County.

Here are some random photos that I have of the Colville area (Stevens County).

Our favorite grocery store.

We have a Super Wal-Mart and I’m bonding with this store that has most everything we’d need for living in the country.

The Country Store can fill in the gaps for farmers and other property owners.

This is our road. We are up this road about 2 miles.

We get some interesting creature visitors in the country.

The view out to Colville city limits from our kids’ driveway.

This is Colville mountain with our huge C for Colville and a lit up cross.

Highway 395 coming north into Colville with one of our local farm/produce shops, Front Porch.

When we come down our road to town we have the choice to go south to Colville or north to Kettle Falls.

Welcome here to our Country Bungalow in Colville, Washington. Colville is pronounced, Call-ville!

I could have used the letter C for the COVID-19 epidemic but I decided we are getting enough information about the Pandemic. Diversions can be good when we really have no power to change the big picture. We do have the power to change the little picture by keeping our distance and compliance to the mandates set down to slow the spread of the virus. We will continue at home keeping the faith and praying for the end of this. Looking forward to better days or better yet the return of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Signs

We live about 70 miles north of Spokane. Spokane is the city we drive to for shopping at stores like The Home Depot, Costco, Trader Joe’s, Fred Meyer, HomeGoods, TJMaxx, Target, Lowes and Hobby Lobby.

Here in Colville we have a Super Walmart, Super One grocery store, Safeway, Grocery Outlet, Builders Supply, Do It Center, Sears Hometown, North 40 and then several independent one of a kinds.

Spokane is on the eastern edge of Washington State close to the middle of the state. We are in the Northeast corner of the state. Washington State borders Idaho to the East, Oregon to the South, British Columbia Canada to our North and the Pacific Ocean to the West. Many Canadian visitors come down Highway 395 and our road from Canada. On any given day you will see a lot of B.C. license plates on cars in the Walmart parking lot.

We’re due a trip to Spokane for our monthly Costco run but we’ll have to wait out the snow storms that we are experiencing. A two lane highway in the snow with a 60 mph is not the safest way to travel. It would be okay except for other travelers who don’t seem to sense the danger enough to slow down.

Speaking of travelers…

We have a highway in our back acres for Quail.

There is talk for more snow in our neighborhood. Before that happens we are preparing to venture out soon to the grocery store. The sun is shining on the snow and it makes for beautiful vistas. We’ll be bundling up for sure. So thankful for the right clothing to wear when the temps are in the teens.

Happy Wednesday to y’all.

I’ll give it a try to link up to Tom’s Signs2 for this post.

 

Issues

I’m having some difficulty with uploading images to my blog today and these two are the last that I could upload successfully. These are from our road trip to the Coast at the beginning of December.

I’ll need to sort through some issues and see what I can come up with to remedy the problem.

So far it’s been easy to remember to write 2020 on checks and other documents. Hope the new year is starting well for you.

V is for Volcanoes

On my recent trip (May 24, 2017) flying from Seattle to Southern California I had a window seat with some nice views of the Cascades Volcanoes of the Pacific Northwest. This first one is of Mount St. Helens which erupted in 1980. This is visible shortly after taking off from Seattle and heading south. If you want to read more information on these volcanoes you can click over to the USGS here.

This might be Mount Hood in Oregon just across the border from Washington State. “The familiar snow-clad peaks of the Cascade Range are part of a 1,300 km (800 mi) chain of volcanoes, which extends from northern California to southern British Columbia. The volcanoes are the result of the slow slide of dense oceanic crust as it sinks beneath North America (subduction), which releases water and melts overlying rock. This rich volcanic zone contains the well-known landmark volcanoes and approximately 2,900 other known volcanic features ranging from small cinder cones to substantial shield volcanoes.”

Over Oregon I saw these that I believe are the Three Sisters. “As population increases in the Pacific Northwest, areas near the volcanoes are becoming developed and more people and property are at risk. The principal hazards to people in the Pacific Northwest are from lahars and ash fall. Lahars (volcanic mudflows) can destroy buildings and infrastructure. Eruptions that include volcanic ash can be especially dangerous for aircraft, even at long distances from the volcano, because volcanic ash can clog and shut down their engines.” Not a cheery thought while flying over these volcanoes.

This is a zoom in on Crater Lake in Southern Oregon.

This last one is over Northern California and I think it’s Mount Shasta.

I’m linking up to ABC Wednesday which was started by Mrs. Nesbitt and is now administered by a few great bloggers.

I’m slowly catching up after my travels with viewing and commenting on blogs. Doesn’t take much to throw me off my game these days. We are promised some nice warmer temps today and tomorrow in the Seattle area and then we get another bout of rain and cooler temps just in time for the weekend. Dear comes home from Chicago tonight and I’m looking forward to that. I usually don’t have to brew my own coffee in the morning. That’s not the only reason I enjoy having him home. Have a good Tuesday!

Good Fences

This fence is in the town of Coupeville on Whidbey Island. Coupeville is on the shores of Penn Cove. We enjoy the Penn Cove Mussels in this little island town in Washington State. Truth be told it’s the sauce that makes a mussel dish good in my opinion. We’ve enjoyed eating at Front Street Grill in this little town and they serve mussels in a variety of very tasty sauces. One of my favorites is Coconut Green Curry Mussels!

Linking up with TexWisGirl for Good Fences #99!

Soon I hope to take a drive on this island again. We’re having a “sisters” weekend early March and my head is spinning with fun things we can do together. Two sisters in Washington state and the other two sisters in Southern California. We are meeting up in the northwest.  I never tried mussels or oysters or much fish to speak of until we moved to the Seattle area. Fish was not something my mother was too familiar with in the kitchen. We also ate kosher growing up so shell fish was taboo.

Hope you have a good Thursday!

Good Fences…

walk'16

These are some of the fences on our walking loop. Dear and I are still heading out most days for a forty minute heart pumping walk in our neighborhood. Dear is working from home these days so I’m happy to have a walking partner. It’s a good computer/reading/housework break for him and for me. We try to get out before or after the rain and sometimes walk in light rain, too.

I’m linking up with Tex*Wis*Girl for Good Fences #98.

On Wednesday I traveled to a large Asian store in Bellevue, Washington, to see if I could find some more items for our Chinese New Year Super Bowl party. I hit the jackpot and found several great additions for our party like almond cookies, fortune cookies, Tsingtao, and lucky coins. There is a Goodwill next store to the Asian Market. I was so disappointed about how overpriced several items were at Goodwill. Sheesh…a used dinner plate for $7.99…really??? I had to search long and hard to find items that were reasonably priced. Goodwill needs a wake up call. Thanks for letting me whine!

High Winds Wreak Havoc…

On Saturday morning the rains came and then high winds began. Early in the afternoon when the high winds really whipped up we knew we had to go out and remove the patio covers before they and our supports were ruined. Shortly after the covers and any light furniture and decor were tucked away nicely the power went out. We were without power from two in the afternoon until seven in the evening. We were the lucky ones who had their power restored. Our kids still did not have power on Sunday morning. When we left the house for church on Sunday morning we saw some of the wind damage in our neighborhood.

Saturday was not a good day to travel anywhere and I’m happy we all stayed at home and rode out the storm. Katie and I worked on a jigsaw puzzle by candlelight.

My neighbors are now waiting for insurance adjusters to come out and survey the damage before they do any removal.

These examples were minor compared to other damaged property and some lives lost when trees landed on top of cars driving down the road. There are still thousands of households without power.

We are very thankful for the rain and that the high winds are dying down. Hope your weekend was more peaceful…

I’ll be linking up to ABC Wednesday started by Mrs. Nesbitt and carried on by Roger and the ABC team on Tuesday. H is for High Winds and Havoc!

InSpired Sunday

Backroads of Washington…

Colville, Washington.

Republic, Washington.

Republic, Washington

Holy Rosary in Tonasket, Washington. The whole city of Tonasket was on level 3 evacuation notice last week. The level was later lowered.

These churches are in areas of Washington that have been on fire watch and evacuation notice. We continue to pray for containment of the many fires still burning in Washington State. We have a mountain range between us and the major fire areas and the last couple days the smoke has traveled over the Cascade Mountain range and is hanging in the air in Western Washington. The setting sun was orange yesterday. Rain without lightning would be a very welcome event.

Linking up to InSPIREd Sunday with Beth and Sally!

Today for our Sunday Worship the church doors were closed and we had over 2000 volunteers go out to our area schools to spruce up the grounds and help teachers in their classrooms get ready for the new year. Community Serve Day is a great event that we have the privilege to participate in as a church every year. Here’s a collage of Dear getting areas ready for fresh paint before the event today. Today he painted the brick wall that he pressure washed on Friday. I helped in one of the classrooms doing whatever the teacher asked of me.