Stars and Stripes Barn

This barn was spotted off Douglas Falls Rd. in Colville, Washington on September 3rd.

I’ll be linking up to The Barn Collective hosted by Tom The Backroads Traveller.

While we were in Colville over Labor Day weekend we visited a friend of our daughter in law’s family who lives alone and is getting on in age. I took these next photos at her charming older home. She has a nice grape arbor and we picked several clusters of her seedless grapes to take back to D and J’s.

I’ll also be linking up to Mosaic Monday with Maggie at Normandy Life.

We are over half way through September already. Autumn is upon us and we are seeing the seasonal changes around this old house. Soon we’ll be raking leaves. Do you see changes in your neck of the woods?

We Can See Clearly Now…

…the smoke is gone.

We have blue skies again and white clouds that are visible after we enjoyed a light rain last night and today.

Our pear tree is full to the brim and I always wonder when the time is right to pick the pears. I will have lots to share this year. Our apple crop was very small this year compared.

Since we had some cooler days Dear decided to freshen up the shingles and scrape and paint the overhang.

Things are looking a lot better.

The hydrangeas are still looking nice even though they are waning. The raindrops on their leaves and petals looked refreshing.

We’re enjoying the look of the ground cover varieties we planted. Looks like I need to weed out a couple of grass blades.

It’s a full time of year in our yard.

We are so thankful for our cooler nights and our clear skies. It is so refreshing and we were tired of moaning about the smoke and haze!

“Shower, O heavens, from above,
    and let the clouds rain down righteousness;
let the earth open, that salvation and righteousness may bear fruit;
    let the earth cause them both to sprout;
    I the Lord have created it.”

Isaiah 45:8 (ESV)

 

Country Barns…

…from the U.S.A. and British Columbia, Canada.

On our way to Canada on Saturday afternoon we slowed down at the border and I took a shot of this white barn right next to the border between the U.S.A. and British Columbia. We had a nice little chat with the Border agent and she decided we were worthy to enter her country. We stopped at Terry and Lovella’s once we were in Abbotsford and enjoyed some refreshments and conversation before we headed to our main event in Canada, a 70’s themed birthday party for one of our MGCC gals and her dear hubby.

We followed Terry and Lovella to the party and I snapped these photos as we flew along the B.C. country roads.

I’ll be sharing the photos from the groovy party soon, can you dig it?

Our cookie treats at each dinner place setting at the 70’s party.

Linking up to The Barn Collective with Tom and Mosaic Monday with Maggie.

Oh dear…I will be having 2 late nights in a row. We got home from Canada last night after 11pm and tonight I’m headed to a 7:30 Seattle Sounders Soccer match. I guess I was born to boogie. Peace out y’all.

Mosaic Monday

A couple Saturdays ago I walked with the Wonder Walkers group from church at Evans Creek Preserve in Sammamish.

It was a good walk with several trails and some higher elevations to hike up, too.

Thankfully this was the only wildlife we saw. There are bear warnings here. We did hear lots of birds.

I’m linking up to Mosaic Monday with Maggie at Normandy Life.

We had a couple events this weekend, a very special birthday party and a baby shower. I’ll share photos from the birthday party soon.

Mid June Mosaics

Good Monday morning to you. We spent a little time outside tidying up the yard on Saturday and I snapped a few photos. I was reminded that this flower above is a Delphinium. I love it’s soft color.

These wild ferns are taking over our far side yard. It’s a more wild part of our grounds. I pulled a few out as they were choking out some other wild plants.

These Snapdragons are a surprise since we didn’t plant them. Their seeds must have been carried over to this part of our planter by the wind or a bird. I’m happy to see them.

These are three of our hydrangeas in different parts of our yard. The one behind our Pink Dogwood is a white more delicate variety. The large bush in the upper right blooms purplish blue. When we planted it from a pot it had been deep pink. The newest hydrangea that we planted last year in the lower right might be bluish purple, too. We’ll see what influence the soil we planted it in has on it.

We are fortunate in the Puget Sound area of Washington state to have a great variety of plants and trees that grow well. This time of year the grass and weeds grow so it’s time for me to go out and mow! I’m thanking God that I can still manage to mow while Dear does the weed whacking. My best exercise of the week.

I’m joining  Maggie’s Mosaic Monday.

Swords Into Plowshares

On our walks in Magnuson Park with our daughter we have visited this sculpture area called The Fin Project.

The Fin Project: From Swords Into Plowshares 1998 by John T. Young, Artist, Max Gurvich, Producer

“They shall beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks: nation shall not lift up a sword against nation, neither shall they learn war anymore…” Old Testament, Micah, Chapter 4:3.

This artwork is made using diving plane fins from decommissioned U.S. Navy nuclear submarines built in the 1960s. It is about peace, turning weapons into Art, recycling, and honoring the men and women who served our country during the Cold War. It also may remind the viewer of dorsal fins of a pod of Orca whales or a school of salmon.

I’m adding some more photos from our recent walk at Magnuson Park.

Magnuson Park is a 350 acres park on Sand Point at Pontiac Bay, Lake Washington, in the Sand Point neighborhood of Seattle, Washington. The park is the second largest in Seattle, after 534 acres Discovery Park in Magnolia.

Established in 1900 (military use 1922-1975).

And now for some favorites that we received via text earlier this week and this morning.

Sweet little Addy is discovering her hands and fists! Soon we’ll be seeing little Addy and her parents in person again. Here’s Addy on her first Mother’s Day.

Seriously? I love this face! This little one had a nice Mother’s Day with her mom, daddy and Granny Linda and Granny Florence, and great uncle Scott and great aunt Rhonda. I had a very nice Mother’s Day with our firstborn Josh and Laura, who treated us to brunch. Phone calls came in from Addy’s Daddy and from our daughter Katie and my dear old Pop, too. I’m blessed.

I’ll be linking up to Mosaic Monday with Maggie at Normandy Life.

Tulip Mosaics

Tulips last a short time every year and I’m always keen to see them in the muddy or dry conditions on the tulip farms north of us in Skagit County. Dear and I traveled north on Tuesday morning May 2nd. The tulip festival usually runs the month of April but because of the weather and a late bloom this year they extended the festival into the first week of May.

One of our favorite stops is at Roozengaarde in Mount Vernon. They always have a beautiful display.

The Skagit Valley Tulip Festival is the largest festival in Northwest Washington State. Each year more than 1 million visitors come to experience over 300 acres of brightly colored tulips.

Who is behind the tulips?  Roozengaarde was established in 1985 by the Roozen family and Washington Bulb Company, Inc. The Roozen family business of growing Tulips, Daffodils and Irises is the largest in the world, covering Skagit Valley with more than 1200 acres of field blooms and 15 acres of greenhouses.  William Roozen emigrated from Holland in 1947 with years of experience in the bulb industry. He had a good back, strong hands, and a heart pulsing with dreams. Roozen started a bulb farm on five acres of land, holding meetings in a garage and toiling long hours beside a few hired hands. He saved money by buying used tractors and farm equipment.

The Roozen family’s hard work ethic spans at least six generations. The family first began raising tulips in Holland in the mid-1700’s.  In the Skagit Valley, Roozen (which means “roses” in Dutch) worked for other farmers before setting off on his own in 1950. Five years later, he purchased the Washington Bulb Co., founded by two of the area’s first bulb farmers, Joe Berger and Cornelius Roozekrans. The Washington Bulb Co. now farms about 2,000 acres of land.  In 1985, William Roozen handed the business down to his five sons and a daughter, Bernadette Roozen Miller, who passed away in 1996.  William Roozen passed away on July 13, 2002 and, with 35 grandchildren, was confident the family company will keep growing.

We had another garden adventure in May that I will share this week. Our daughter Katie took this selfie of us on that adventure.

Woke up this Monday morning to sunshine! What a nice sight. This week is the last quiet week at this old house before we start traveling east, south and further east.

I’m linking up to Mosaic Monday with Maggie at Normandy Life.