St. Saviour Anglican Church

St. Saviour’s Pro-Cathedral is an excellent example of a Gothic Perpendicular church in stone, and thus reminiscent of many English churches. Visitors are amazed by the jewel-like stained glass windows that depict stories from the Bible and, by their dedications, provide a connection to the history of families that helped build Nelson.

St. Saviour’s congregation began in 1890 when Nelson was a raw mining town. In the early days St. Saviour’s was likely a haven for homesick English men and women far from their homes.  The words and music of the traditional Church of England services, no doubt, brought great comfort. A Mission Room was erected in 1892 and the stone church was opened in 1899. The church burned to its granite walls in 1928 and was rebuilt in 1929. The stained glass windows that grace the church were donated after the fire.  St. Saviour’s is still one of Nelson’s best loved heritage buildings.

Dear and I had a very enjoyable visit with a couple ladies from the church who welcomed visitors on this day.

I am the good Shepherd and know my sheep.

The Good Shepherd window-McCauslands masterpiece for this church, was donated by Consolidated Mining and Smelting President Selwyn G. Blaylock in memory of his parents Rev. Thomas and Mrs. Eleanor Blaylock.

John 10:11-18 English Standard Version (ESV)

11 I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. 12 He who is a hired hand and not a shepherd, who does not own the sheep, sees the wolf coming and leaves the sheep and flees, and the wolf snatches them and scatters them. 13 He flees because he is a hired hand and cares nothing for the sheep. 14 I am the good shepherd. I know my own and my own know me, 15 just as the Father knows me and I know the Father; and I lay down my life for the sheep. 16 And I have other sheep that are not of this fold. I must bring them also, and they will listen to my voice. So there will be one flock, one shepherd. 17 For this reason the Father loves me, because I lay down my life that I may take it up again. 18 No one takes it from me, but I lay it down of my own accord. I have authority to lay it down, and I have authority to take it up again. This charge I have received from my Father.”

The Good Samaritan.

The Miracle of the Widow’s Son is in memory of Dr. William Rose who was not only a medical man but also became mayor and a Provincial Legislator.

A representation of the Holman Hunt painting “Behold I stand at the door and knock” is in memory of Mary Spurway, mother of noted Nelson photographer Dick Spurway. Her husband Rowland was a true frontiersman-a cowboy and trapper who could speak 3 First Nations Languages-Blackfoot, Cree and Sioux.

The Faith Charity and Hope window is in memory of Florence Douch one of Nelson’s unsung heroes of the Spanish Flu epidemic of 1918.

Jesus as a boy talking with the elders in the temple. In memory of Charles Wesley Busk, who was a pioneer and surveyor in the area. He donated the land for St. Michael and All Angels Church in Balfour and All Saints Church Longbeach. He had an estate at Kokanee Creek and was instrumental in forming the 1st Scout Troop in Nelson–Scouts still meet at Camp Busk.

The Joy window showing the Risen Christ.

The Ascension window is in memory of Lesley Vivian Rogers and his wife Eva Jane. Rogers was the “Home Child” from England and later served as a drummer boy in the Boer War. He became the Principal of Nelson High School keeping his position for 24 years – L. V. Rogers High School (the present day Sr. high) is named after him.

The Nativity Window created by McCausland of Toronto -it has a typical scroll on the lower edge and it is the only window in the church which shows the McCausland signature.

The window of the Last Supper is in memory of Bishop Frederick Patrick Clark, who died suddenly while visiting Cranbrook in 1954. An overflow of 400 people attended the funeral at St. Saviour’s with clergy from around B.C., Alberta and the U.S.A. This it the newest window in the church and is a bit controversial as “consecrate is spelt wrongly and Judas has been given a Halo. The window was not made by the McCauslands as their quote for $1120.00 was turned down.

This Coronation Tapestry is an actual tapestry from the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, June 1953. Drapes and tapestries decorating Westminster Abbey during the Coronation ceremony were later distributed to all Cathedrals in the Empire.

The crochet of the Last Supper has an interesting history. It was given to a young nurse in gratitude for her part in saving the life of a sick child. The young nurse was called out to a lonely farmhouse in the depth of winter and stayed for several days until the child recovered when the impoverished parents gave her the tapestry. Many years later on the death of her husband the nurse unrolled the tapestry and had it framed as a memorial to her husband.

After our visit to the church, which we really enjoyed, we walked down a few blocks to enjoy a snack of mussels and fresh bread at Jackson’s Hole and Grill. We walked back to our car and drove to the cemetery and then headed back home to the U.S.A.

St. John Vianney Chapel ~ Kenmore

While I was “on the coast”, besides spending time with the Mennonite Girls in Canada, I was able to have some extended time with our Coast Kids. On Thursday afternoon my daughter-in-law and I were able to visit this chapel in Kenmore where she and her family have a lot of history. The chapel is now a part of Bastyr University which is an alternative medicine university. I’m happy that they have kept the chapel in tact. St. John Vianney church have built a new church further down the road from this location. The stained glass windows are amazing works of art. I hope they will always be preserved.

After we spent time in the chapel we drove past our former home in Kenmore and were a wee bit disappointed in the upkeep of the property. Laura’s parents have also sold their homestead in this past year and we had the same feeling when we drove past her childhood home.

Later on Thursday evening we had a tasty dinner at Josh and Laura’s with Andrew, Katie and my sister Lana and her husband Steve. I was so pleased that we were able to have this time of fellowship together while I was in town. On Friday I got some alone shopping in and when Katie was done with work we spent a few hours together and met up with Josh for dinner, too. My time on “The Coast” was filled to the brim with what matters most.

Linking up with Angie at Letting Go of the Bay Leaf for Mosaic Monday.

I’m catching up after being away from home and this will be a busy week into the weekend, too. Hopefully I’ll have some good pockets of time to visit my favorite blogs. Hope you all have a good week ahead.

InSPIREd Sunday ~ St Michael and All Angels’ Church

Broadway Day 7 031While we spent a morning in the Cotswold town of Broadway we enjoyed a visit to this church just down the road from the Pub we were going to have lunch at. The present parish church, built in 1840, and dedicated to St. Michael and All Angels, is a building with nave, two aisles and chancel.

Broadway Day 7 033Broadway Day 7 039Its chief antiquity is the pulpit, which is a fine piece of wood carving, and was transferred from the old church. It was reconstructed and part of it was used to form a chair which had since been stolen from the sanctuary.

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Broadway Day 7 034We were intrigued with these ornate Eagle lecterns that we saw in most of the churches and cathedrals we visited in England. I researched to see the significance of this design. Here’s one explanation:

THE FLYING eagle is the symbol of John the Evangelist (see Revelation, ch 4, v 7) who proclaimed Christ as ‘the Word of God’ at the beginning of his Gospel. The flying eagle is thus a suitable emblem from which God’s word is read, reaching (we hope) the ends of the earth. The eagle is also thought of as the bird which flies nearest to heaven. I am not sure such lecterns are confined just to the Anglican church. It was not until the Reformation that the lectern became prominent in ordinary parish churches of the reformed tradition, carrying the open bible.

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Broadway Day 7 044This is my favorite Stained Glass Window from this church and appropriate for a church named St Michael and All Angels Church.

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Broadway Day 7 047I love old doors of all kinds and this door into the church is very cool.

InSPIREd Sunday is hosted by  Beth and Sally. This is a weekly meme devoted to sharing religious architecture from around the world.

Hope your Sunday is going well.

Stow ~ The Church of St. Edward

Ancient and historic Stow on-the Wold is the highest town in the Cotswolds standing 800 feet above sea level.

Stow on the Wold 001One of the historic Cotswold buildings in Stow on the Wold is the church of St Edward.The church is primarily a product of the 11th century with later additions in the 15th century. Quite apart from the lovely architecture, the church has a significant historical connection with the Battle of Stow on the Wold. The battle was the final conflict of the English Civil War.

Seeing this church door flanked by the ancient Yew trees is what first drew me to making Stow on the Wold a must see town in the Cotswolds. Here’s the inside photo of this great door.

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The 88ft high 4-stage tower, completed in 1447, is a conspicuous landmark with an embattled parapet with pinnacles and a string course with gargoyles.

In 1646 a Royalist army marched through the Cotswolds in a desperate attempt to join up with King Charles at Oxford. They were finally confronted at Stow on the Wold by a Parliamentary force. The fighting was fierce and deadly. The Royalists were defeated and over 1000 imprisoned within the church.

We made a quick stop in this town on our trip in September of 2013, this time we stopped for a longer stay and enjoyed spending some time inside the church of St. Edward.

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Stow on the Wold 007This portion of 1 Chronicles 16 was sculpted from Cotswold Stone

Stow on the Wold 006Let the heavens be glad, and let the earth rejoice:
and let men say among the nations, The Lord reigneth.
Let the sea roar, and the fulness thereof:
let the fields rejoice, and all that is therein.
Then shall the trees of the wood sing out at the presence of the Lord,

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Stow on the Wold 011When we were done inside the church we walked around this small market town and enjoyed visiting some of the shops.

Stow on the Wold 025The Kings Arms on the market square hosted King Charles I before the Battle of Naseby in 1645.

It’s amazing to think these buildings have been standing for so long. I’m always blown away by the history in the places we visit in England.

Travel Tips for Stow-on-the-Wold. The market square has free two hour parking but when your two hours are up you have to move your car out of the square and find parking at other lots close by. The Fosseway long term parking near Tesco is said to have free parking. When you see “no returns” that means you can’t just change the spot your car is parked in. There is a good variety of shops and places to eat in Stow. We strolled through a few “thrift” stores in town which usually have names like Oxfam, Blue Cross, and others that benefit Hospice care or heart research, etc.

Bishop’s Palace Windows

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Within the Bishop’s Palace there is a small chapel. Most of the windows in this post are from the chapel. Reconciliation is an important theme in the Chapel. The five icons behind the altar tell the Biblical story of God’s reconciling love for humanity throughout the ages. The Celtic knot under the altar also reflects this symbolism. I posted the icons with my Sunday Hymn here.

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The Chapel was restored by Bishop George Henry Law in the nineteenth century. In the windows he used fragments of French medieval glass from churches in the Rouen area, which were destroyed in the revolutionary era.

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We are finally getting some sunshine streaming into our windows at this old house. It really lifts the spirits! As I look out my windows today I’m seeing a steady stream of leaves falling and birds are pecking about in the lawns. What are you seeing out your windows?

St. James Church, Chipping Campden

The church of St James, is a landmark for miles around, can be found at the north end of Chipping Campden. It is a magnificent example of an early perpendicular wool church, rebuilt in the 15th century.

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We walked away from the village center to walk about The Church of St. James. We really enjoyed the views of the church and from the church.

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And from the inside of the church…

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Alton to Cotswolds 186” The finely carved canopied tomb of Sir Thomas Smythe is on the North wall in the sanctuary and is the most remarkable in the church. He was Lord of the Manor of Campden until his death in 1593.  He lived at the court of Henry VIII and was the first Governor of the East India Company.

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Some interesting history of the church can be read by clicking here. It was interesting to me to read about the “peal of eight bells”. We passed this Inn on our way back to the town center from St. James.

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Hope you all are having a nice weekend and for our friends in Canada I hope you are enjoying your traditional Thanksgiving meals with some loved ones. For the most part we’ve had a very unproductive weekend here at this old house. We did manage to take apart and clean out our dishwasher which revealed some interesting stuff…icky. Maybe the beginning of our week will be more productive. We have some fun plans for the end of this week. How about you?