Western Larch

Larches are different from most conifers because they’re deciduous–they lose their needles each fall. In addition, their needles are arranged differently from those of most conifers; on current-year twigs they’re borne singly, but on older twigs they arise in dense clusters from stout, woody pegs that resemble wooden barrels. Only 10 species of larch occur in the world, mostly in cold parts of the northern hemisphere. Only western larch and subalpine larch grow in the Pacific Northwest. Larches are commonly called tamaracks, especially by people whose roots are in eastern North America.

 

Needles are deciduous. They fall from the tree in winter, turning brilliant yellow before they fall.

Needles are about 1″ long and typically grow in dense clusters (20-40) attached to short woody shoots (called spur shoots).

Needles are soft to the touch–never sharp or spiny. Current-year needles are borne singly on slender pegs.

Small, woody cones (1-2″ long).

The photos above were taken on October 30th on a drive Dear and I took out Addy-Gifford Rd. to Bluecreek Rd. The following photos are from 2012 on our son’s property in Chewelah.

I was happy to find that we have Larches on our new piece of property.

We did not have any random trick or treaters coming to our door last night but we did have our Colville family drop in for some treats and our little Miss Addy was sporting goofy smiles for the evening. What a joy to have these drop in visits!

Happy November to all of you!

 

Farewell October…

We took a drive yesterday to a taxidermist in the back country. I’ll be sharing a post about Larch Trees that we saw on those back roads soon.

Today we are wondering if we will have any trick or treaters at our Country Bungalow. Time will tell. We do know that one little girl will stop by with her parents sometime in the evening. Do you get many costumed cuties at your front door?

Falling Leaves plus…

We gathered for our 2nd Annual Family Hunting trip. The guys spent a couple days hunting and then we filled in the days with Fallish things to enjoy. They are able to hunt a few miles from where we live. We now have a cold room which is a good place to hang the deer while they are prepped for the phase two job of butchering and packing the meat. This year Josh and Dan each got a buck their first day out. Josh opted to take his deer to a local meat processing company. Dan and Jamie packaged their deer on their own.

Before the Western Washington kids headed home we all enjoyed a Thanksgiving meal together. The family shots from our Thanksgiving are coming soon.

Hello October…

The Fall colors are showing nicely all around us.

Slowly but surely the boxes are getting emptied. We’ve made a trip to Habitat for Humanity with a load of stuff. We are replacing a lot of the indoor lighting with more efficient lighting options. Today Dear coiled and stored many of the outdoor hoses. There are probably 16 different hoses to reach the vegetation on our property. Spring and Summer of 2019 will be a learning experience for us. Fall and Winter should take care of itself as far as vegetation goes. We’ll need to figure out our snow plowing/clearing options.

Did I mention we have a greenhouse and a pond? We enjoyed some tomatoes and cucumbers that were ready to harvest when we moved in. We also enjoyed some sweet and delicious corn on the cob right from our back acreage. We have just under 5 acres here. I was happy that Dear found my muck boots in one of the bins. They are a necessary item to muck about in. Now as far as the pond goes, that’s another learning curve. We’ll need to come up with some algae and mosquito abatement options come Spring.

But for now…I’ll concentrate on the boxes.

In October I’m turning to Colossians for my daily reading. So rich with so much to mull over. Hope October is full of good things for you.

Escaping

When renovations begin I start looking for avenues of escape.

On Saturday I picked up my sister Lana and we headed to a Junk Trunk event in Monroe, Washington. Lots of vendors under one roof. I’m kicking myself for not picking up a business card at this booth where these sweet metal creations that you can attach to any frame were displayed. Some of the pieces were also on stakes that you could put in a planter. At other booths I bought a couple of nativity sets that I’ll share after I put up my Christmas decor. There were just too many people at this popular event which made it hard to see everything but easy to bump into each other. Thankfully Lana and I kept a smile on our faces.

Sunday after church I headed out again to do some shopping and successfully ticked some things off my list.

On my way from Kirkland Trader Joe’s to Woodinville Homegoods I pulled off the road to take these photos of the beautiful color we are still enjoying around these parts.

Speaking of lists my sister-in-law who has been a homeschool educator and former director of Grace Academy for years has a blog post up on 10 off the radar Christmas books with a good review of each book. Click here to see the books and her reviews.

We have a very busy week ahead before we head to Colville on Thursday for our early Thanksgiving celebration. We have to get snow tires on our vehicle and pick up chains just in case the pass gets too much snow. The weather is not cooperating with pass travel already this year. Our quartz counter tops might be ready to be installed this Wednesday or next Tuesday. Thankfully I’m not hosting a big Thanksgiving meal here this year especially since I keep needing to escape from this old house. We are headed to a friend’s home on Thanksgiving Thursday with a large casserole filled with candied yams.

Are you hosting Thanksgiving this year or if you are Canadian, did you host Thanksgiving last month?

Barns, Pumpkins, Corn Mazes and More!

On Sunday October 15th the girls headed to Knight Farm to enjoy the corn maze and pumpkin patch. The Barn built in 1907 is on the Washington State Heritage Barn Register.

With corn maze map in hand (Katie’s hand) we set off for the maze entrance.

Katie masterfully led us to each checkpoint in the maze never making a wrong turn.

Addy started out awake and soon fell fast asleep.

We started at the bottom at station #10 and ended our trek at station #1.

When we were done with the maze Addy woke up and we picked out 3 pumpkins. One for daddy, one for mommy, and one for Addy.

Yep, the cutest little pumpkin in the patch!

While in the maze I spotted these farms with barns in the distance.

The guys were done hunting on Sunday with early success bringing a buck home just after noon.  Andrew had to leave us all to drive the 350 miles back to Seattle so he could be in class on Monday morning. Dear, Josh and Dan started the hard work of prepping the venison while we were away at the pumpkin patch.

I spared everyone the full image of the buck in the back of our son’s truck but you can see the antlers if you look closely. One side of the antlers look like they are growing out of Joshua’s head. Andrew left before they had the celebratory toast.

Addy with auntie Katie before we got dressed for the pumpkin patch. She was interested in the guys excitement in retelling the story of how their successful hunting morning unfolded.

Linking up with Tom for The Barn Collective and Maggie at Normandy Life for Mosaic Monday.