Trusses Part 1

We got the revised plans to make the trusses right from the Pole Barn Company and it was full steam ahead to get the trusses to their spots on the shop pad. Cousin Jim helped Dear maneuver the very heavy trusses.

They learned a lot with the first truss and the next ones took a quarter of the time to get them to their spots.

So thankful for our son’s tractor.

While the guys worked on the trusses I mowed the lawns. This might be the last mow until Spring. Jim snapped these photos of me at work.

After the trusses were in their temporary spots Jim and Dear used hammers, nails, drills and screws to prep the trusses for the cross beams. Lots of hand, wrist and arm work. They were sore. We had a very nice steak dinner the evening after they had accomplished so much.

My cousin really wanted to see those trusses lifted to their final position to the top of the shop building but we have to wait for the extensions to arrive and Jim had to move on to his next destination on his way back home to California.

Thursday is catch up day here at our Country Bungalow to get things ready for our next overnight guests arriving on Friday and Saturday. We’re excited to see our kids all together again here in the northeastern corner of our state. Thursday is also wood gathering day for our son’s winter supply. Trucks, Chainsaws and chainsaw safety chaps are headed to the permitted areas of forest for wood gathering. Our son and Dear will put in a hard day of work in the forest.

Marcus Cider Fest & Parade

On Saturday morning we headed north on highway 25 along the Columbia River/Lake Roosevelt to the little town of Marcus. Marcus hosts the best little festival around. Annually in October the crowds head to Marcus for Cider Fest and the Parade.

We were so happy to see the day dawn with the promise of sunshine instead of rain.

The parade rolls along right on Highway 25. We found our spots and waited for it to begin.

Some of the firetrucks and other vehicles are loud and Addy had to hold her ears.

Smokey the Bear even made an appearance!

90% of the parade participants threw handfuls of candy to any kids along the parade route.

Dear kept tabs on Addy to keep her safe.

JJ will have more fun next year at the parade when he can pick up candy, too.

After the parade we met up with “our people” to enjoy some of the classic cider fest treats like fresh pressed apple cider and caramel apples. My cousin Jim, from California, enjoyed the fest and made some purchases to take home with him. Dear bought some local honey for us.

Addy was leading Gramps along and then Uncle Scott took over.

So sweet to see JJ’s big smiles while looking at his mommy.

You can’t get any fresher than this. Look at all that pomace (pulp/skin) discarded to get the fresh pressed cider. The cider was so sweet and delicious! They sold it by the gallon, half gallon, and by the glass.

We said goodbye to our people and headed home with a stop along the highway to get some photos of Lake Roosevelt. What a beautiful day it was.

Zooming in across the lake to the other shore.

We will put the festival on our calendar for next year.

After we dropped our purchases off at home we headed south to our favorite Mexican restaurant with Jim and after lunch we took some back roads on our way home.

Today, Monday the 7th, Dear and my cousin are going to try to get the trusses up on the shop posts with the help of our son’s tractor. I’ll be praying along during the process for sure!

Hope your new week runs smoothly for you.

October 2019

Country life has taken a very busy turn for us. The first three weeks of October are filled to the brim. It was good to have a nice hour walk with a friend on Wednesday along the trails by the Dominion Meadows Golf Course here in Colville.

Our cousin Jim is here right now and we connected with another cousin in Colville who we’ll have dinner with on Friday while Jim is here. I hope we remember to take some photos. Jim plans to move along in his travels leaving here on Monday.

Our Connection Groups at FBC start up this Sunday for 6 weeks.

Our Third annual family hunting get together is coming up and our “Coast Kids” start arriving on the 11th.

A wedding has been added to our calendar on the 12th of October and we’ll travel to Spirit Lake in Idaho with our kids, Andrew and Katie, for that event.

Dear and I are heading to the Truth Matters Conference in Southern California on the 15th.

After the 19th of October we do have some free days until the 30th of October if anyone feels inclined to have a casual visit. You know who I’m talking to. No more snow in the forecast. But things are subject to change.

My computer time is going to be slim these weeks so if you don’t see me around you will understand why.

Some Spurgeon to close this post…

Always remember this. In common life the wisest thing is the right, straight, undeviating course. The right thing is always the wisest. Sometimes it looks as if it really is necessary to go off the straight line and just take a shortcut. It seems so, but it never is. The take of the shortcut is a book of lamentations from beginning to end. But you need not be a philosopher to discover how you should act under any circumstances. The way to act in every case is to fear God and keep His commandments. Straight Ahead!

Here we go…straight ahead into October and beyond!

Singing in the Rain

When Addy was here on Monday it started raining in the afternoon. She started asking if I had an umbrella for her. I wish I would have recorded her saying umbrella. It was something like umbuella or umbebella. So darn cute. When we went to the garage and found this one she wondered if I had something smaller for her. Sadly no but she managed to navigate with the big one.

JJ and mommy watched Addy and the progress on the shop from under cover.

We were hoping for another dry day today but alas it is raining. Dear will have to navigate the last 4 huge beams into their holes in the rain and then hope to get the concrete delivered tomorrow morning during a dry period, if possible.

And, in other news, our kids have spotted a bear on their property and lots of evidence that the bear is enjoying the apples from their apple tree. It also tried to get into one of their out buildings. YIKES! Just another day in the country… Thankfully this is the largest wild animal we have seen on our property. She was really staring us down as if she owned the property and wondered what we were doing on it. We were behind the slider.

Gleaned from my morning readings from Piper this time, Life As A Vapor:

Don’t be duped by the gurus of the age. 

One enslaving fad follows another.

The wisdom of this age is folly in view of eternity.

Don’t follow a defeated foe. Follow Christ. It is costly. You will be an exile in this age. But you will be free.

Happy Fall Y’all

The photo above was taken last fall.

We are beginning to see some colors changing this year.

Fall is one of my favorite seasons and I’m looking forward to see what it brings our way.

Monday morning, machinery is being delivered here so that Dear and our son can auger holes to set all the posts to support the shop.

Later this week the concrete will be delivered to pour into the holes. We are hoping the weather cooperates for the hardening process. We were a little surprised to see a snowflake in the weather predictions for next Sunday. Yikes.

Before September slips away here is a poem by John Updike…
“The breezes taste
Of apple peel.
The air is full
Of smells to feel-
Ripe fruit, old footballs,
Burning brush,
New books, erasers,
Chalk, and such.
The bee, his hive,
Well-honeyed hum,
And Mother cuts
Chrysanthemums.
Like plates washed clean
With suds, the days
Are polished with
A morning haze.

–   John Updike, September

Changes

Time for the summer scenes to be replaced with autumn. I’ll be on the search through my plates to see if I have fall flavored plates for this section of our corner cabinet.

When we were in Spokane last week I picked up a couple new fall accents at Hobby Lobby for our bungalow and instead of packing them away until September 23rd I found good spots for them right now. This fox called to me and I thought the grands would enjoy him, too. He’s soft so when the door opens and shuts it’s not a problem.

This banner that says BLESSED was plain and I bought the package of leaves to add to it.

We bought some suspenders for Dear so he could do all his bending over and kneeling down work on his new shop in comfort instead of having to adjust his trousers constantly. He found the suspender fasteners that he could apply to his work trousers and add the suspenders when he wants. Some of the lumber deliveries have been made and our garage is full of the lumber so my car will be living outside until the building begins. Right now the corner posts marks are square and ready for the auger work to excavate and then set the posts in concrete. The type of building we are adding is called a Post Frame Building.

I’ll leave you with a Spurgeon quote. He is becoming one of my favorite preachers to quote. I’m always on the lookout for any Spurgeon books I can find in thrift stores. These next quotes are from Exploring the Mind & Heart of the Prince of Preachers Compiled by Kerry James Allen

“Every time the sheep bleats, it loses a mouthful, and every time we complain we lose a blessing.”

“We need not sow thistles and brambles; they come up naturally enough, because they are indigenous to earth: and so, we need not teach men to complain; they complain fast enough without any education.”

Western Larch

Larches are different from most conifers because they’re deciduous–they lose their needles each fall. In addition, their needles are arranged differently from those of most conifers; on current-year twigs they’re borne singly, but on older twigs they arise in dense clusters from stout, woody pegs that resemble wooden barrels. Only 10 species of larch occur in the world, mostly in cold parts of the northern hemisphere. Only western larch and subalpine larch grow in the Pacific Northwest. Larches are commonly called tamaracks, especially by people whose roots are in eastern North America.

 

Needles are deciduous. They fall from the tree in winter, turning brilliant yellow before they fall.

Needles are about 1″ long and typically grow in dense clusters (20-40) attached to short woody shoots (called spur shoots).

Needles are soft to the touch–never sharp or spiny. Current-year needles are borne singly on slender pegs.

Small, woody cones (1-2″ long).

The photos above were taken on October 30th on a drive Dear and I took out Addy-Gifford Rd. to Bluecreek Rd. The following photos are from 2012 on our son’s property in Chewelah.

I was happy to find that we have Larches on our new piece of property.

We did not have any random trick or treaters coming to our door last night but we did have our Colville family drop in for some treats and our little Miss Addy was sporting goofy smiles for the evening. What a joy to have these drop in visits!

Happy November to all of you!