One Misty Moisty Morning ~ Ладушки, Ладушки

On mornings like today this old Mother Goose nursery rhyme pops into my head and I say it again and say it again and say it again and again…

One misty moisty morning,
When cloudy was the weather,
I chanced to meet an old man,
Clothed all in leather.
He began to compliment
And I began to grin.
How do you do? And how do you do?
And how do you do again?

When I was a school teacher we had a training session on how important nursery rhymes were to a child’s language development and future reading skills. So take that baby on your knee and have fun with all the nursery rhymes out there. Sing them instead of just saying them. I remember bouncing my kids on my knee with this one, too.

Ride a cock horse to Banbury Cross
To see a fine lady upon a white horse
With rings on her fingers and bells on her toes
She shall have music wherever she goes

There’s also a rhyme we would repeat in Russian that goes something like this…

Ладушки, ладушки
Pat-a-cake
Clapping Song
(Russian)
Ладушки, ладушки
Где были?
У бабушки!
Что ели?
Кашку!
Что пили?
Бражку!
Кашка масленька
Бражка сладенька
Бабушка добренька!
~
The loose translation into English
Pat-a-cake, pat-a-cake,
Where were you?
At granny’s!
What did you eat?
Porridge*!
What did you drink?
A little home-brewed beer**
The porridge is buttered,
The home-brewed beer is sweet,
Granny is kind!
~
The version we sang was a bit different at the end. I’ll need to talk to my mom today and update how we ended this rhyme.
~
*In Russia porridge is very famous, it can be made from wheat (millet), oatmeal, buckwheat, rice, fine-ground barley, etc.**This probably means kvas, a Russian home-brewed non-alcoholic drink, or it means that Granny gave the children some beer to try, she indulged her grandchildren. (and actually if it sits long enough Kvas turns into an alcohol drink)
~
I updated this post with photos from our trip to Banbury, England in July of 2014.
ht: Mama Lisa’s World for the Russian Rhyme.

9 thoughts on “One Misty Moisty Morning ~ Ладушки, Ладушки

  1. To market, to market
    to buy a fat pig
    Home again home again
    Jiggity jig

    To market, to market
    to buy a fat hog
    Home again home again
    Jiggity jog!

    My babies loved that one – of course the bouncing added to the fun.

    “This little piggy” was another favourite. “It’s raining, it’s pouring” was another.

    🙂

  2. Funny but I didn’t learn misty moisty morning untill I taught preschool. We would emphasize a new nursery rhyme each week. You know they are beginning to grasp the concept behind rhyming when children start making up rhyming endings to go with each others names, Ellen melon. Though they can be cruel, and then that is another kind of lesson isn’t it.

    Kathy B, you got my elementary school name correct. Some kids would say “ellen watermelon” 🙂

  3. I find myself quoting Misty Moisty some mornings, too. Only I learned it:

    One misty, moisty morning
    When cloudy was the weather,
    I chanced to meet an old man
    Dressed all in leather.
    Dressed all in leather,
    With a cap under his chin,
    How do ye do and how do ye do
    And how do ye do again!

  4. I am really enjoying your blog. I grew up on Mother Goose and Fairy Tales and passed them along to my children, and then to my grandchildren. To this day, they are still some of my favorite stand-bys.

    Little Tommy Tucker, Jack Spratt, There Was A Little Girl, Pussycat, Pussycat; Little Miss Muffet, I could go on and on and on. My older sister was 12 years my senior. She read to me and taught me these – and taught me the popular songs of the day. When I was just a little over a year old, she had me reciting things and singing “Dream”(when you’re feelin’ blue) on the front porch for her friends. I’d get tired of singing and start to cry. That was the end of the concert. I think she gave me a fine start in life by doing that.
    Nancy

  5. we don’t do as many nursery rhymes these days….sadly, all the “nursery rhymes” books only have the first stanza maybe 2….they hardly ever have the whole story.

    all those old rhymes were initially set to music…but the music is all but lost now. I have a book that was mine as a child with the music written out to many of the old songs…..

    oh but rhymes are not entirely lost from my kids’ childhood…they are called Dr Seuss books or SONGS. My kids love music. For over a year my son requested “Eight Days a Week” many times a day!!

    🙂

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