Sorry, We’re Closed…

Earlier on Tuesday the 20th of September we tried to visit Brasenose College but it was closed. We journeyed along Brasenose Lane (below) to see if we could visit Jesus College or Exeter College on Turl street.

Jesus College was only open to tour groups who had made appointments in advance. So to us this college was also closed. It was fun to put my foot on this sign above. 1974 is a special year for us. The year we were married.

Exeter college was also closed to us so we ventured on Broad Street to Holywell St. and took photos of this interesting building.

We kept going along Holywell to St. Cross Rd. and spent some time at the Holywell Cemetery. (that post will come later) After the cemetery we visited Magdalen College and that post is complete.

We left Magdalen college the way we came in and walked along Merton street past Logic Lane stopping to add to our history on this lane.

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Onward on Merton, disappointed that Merton College was closed to visitors.

It looked so inviting.

This relief, made in 1465, showing St. John the Baptist in the wilderness with the college founder Walter de Merton, with assorted plants and animals, including unicorn, sheep and rabbits in burrows below.

On to Magpie passing the Chapel of Merton, turning right to the High.

When we reached High Street we had another view of University Church of St. Mary the Virgin ahead of us and looking to the right we were happy to see that All Souls College was open and receiving visitors!

All Souls would be a sweet finale to a long day of walking and being denied access to several beautiful colleges, sigh. All Souls deserves a post of it’s own, coming soon. We had lots to take in even though we only had access to two of the five colleges we tried to visit. Throw in a cemetery with some famous folk and it was a good full day.

Back to the present: 

We had a safe trip, although harrowing, from home to Sacred Heart in Spokane for Greg’s follow-up at the Stroke Center. We had to travel in the dark, with fog and rain and it was hard to see the lines in the road. When you are traveling a 2 lane highway this becomes even harder. We were so happy when dawn came. After the appointment, the rest of our trip went well. We are safe and sound at our destination.

Gargoyles

Gargoyles were originally designed in 13th century French architecture as a means of disposing of water. Think of them as the precursor to the gutter. Typically, a trough was cut into the back of the gargoyle and the rainwater was able to run off of the roof and through the gargoyle’s mouth.

And that’s the story I’m sticking to in showing all the gargoyles I took photos of while we were in England in September of 2022. This will be a photo heavy post.

If you would like to read more about gargoyles and grotesques in Oxford click here. You’ll see what I missed and what I’ll keep a lookout for Lord willing we ever are able to return to Oxford.

Back to the present in Colville at our Country Bungalow. It’s been raining and the temps are above freezing. Things are getting very soggy around here. We’ll call this the drip and puddle season that will soon turn to the mud season before we see the green of Spring. Dear is driving again and we managed to snow shovel the way for our truck to get out of the shop and on to the dump to make our winter dump run. Romantic, isn’t it? We did stop for lunch on the way home from the dump so that’s a thing. 🙂 Happy New week to you.

University Church of St Mary the Virgin ~ Oxford

Oxford Day 6 046St Mary’s stands in the physical centre of the old walled City, and the university grew up around it. In medieval times scholars lived in houses with their teachers and the university had no buildings of its own, so it adopted St Mary’s as its centre. The church continued as a parish church, but by the early 13th century it had become the seat of university government, academic disputation, and the awarding of degrees.

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Oxford Day 6 120The Oxford Martyrs ~Each of the three anglican bishops, Latimer, Ridley and Cranmer, who were burnt at the stake in Oxford during the reign of the Roman Catholic queen, ‘Bloody Mary’, underwent part of his trial in St Mary’s. Their principal crime was not to believe the doctrine of transsubstantiation, although Cranmer, as Henry VIII’s Archbishop, had also played a crucial role in the downfall of Queen Mary’s mother, Catherine of Aragon.

Oxford Day 6 118This bit of history at St Mary’s really was interesting to me to read…

John Wesley, founder of Methodism, often attended the University Sermon in his Oxford days, and subsequently, as a Fellow of Lincoln College, preached some of his most stirring sermons before the University here – notably the famous sermon the ‘Almost Christian’ in 1741. In 1744, again in St Mary’s, he denounced the laxity and sloth of the senior members of the University. He was never asked to preach here again. ‘I have preached, I suppose,’ I wrote, ‘the last time in St Mary’s. Be it so. I am now clear of the blood of these men. I have fully delivered my soul.’

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In 1947 a disastrous fire destroyed the original 17th-century ‘Father’ Smith organ. Its replacement, by J W Walker, had become unplayable by 1981. The present organ, the third, was built in 1987 by Metzler Orgelbau of Zurich with the intention of recapturing the spirit of the original ‘Father’ Smith. It is undoubtedly one of the finest instruments of its kind, and incorporates the few of Smith’s decorative pipeshades which survived the fire.
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Oxford Day 6 121While traveling I never have the time to thoroughly study the history of the places we visit. In preparing my posts for my blog, after the fact, I learn so much more information and history and I find out all the things I missed while visiting these amazing places. That’s why I always am ready for another trip to see the things I missed. There’s only so much my brain can absorb in a short visit.
Since we’ve been home and while watching an episode of Endeavor we noticed that the outdoor patio area of this church was in the segment. It’s fun to see the places we’ve visited on these shows.
I’m linking to InSpired Sunday for the first time this week.  This weekly meme is hosted by – Beth and Sally . This is a weekly meme devoted to sharing religious architecture from around the world.