September

“The breezes taste
Of apple peel.
The air is full
Of smells to feel-
Ripe fruit, old footballs,
Burning brush,
New books, erasers,
Chalk, and such.
The bee, his hive,
Well-honeyed hum,
And Mother cuts
Chrysanthemums.
Like plates washed clean
With suds, the days
Are polished with
A morning haze.

–   John Updike, September

Two years ago September Dear, Josh, Laura and I were in England. We were there from September 13th for 10 days.  Two years ago September 13th my dear old mom went to be with Jesus. My dear old pop was melancholy today with all the memories and regrets.

We started a new series at church this morning called You Are Here. We will be looking at why we are here as a church body in our community and in our world.

September always brings new things in the midst of old things. I have started reading an old book that I enjoyed before and now am enjoying again. I found a nice old copy of this book in England on our September trip in 2013.

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When I am finished with this book I have two more books in my queue. One is the new book by Louise Penny, The Nature of the Beast an Inspector Gamache murder mystery and another one which is called The Hole in Our Holiness, Filling the Gap between Gospel Passion and the Pursuit of Godliness by Kevin DeYoung. Yikes, that one will be a convicting one, I’m sure.

September is almost half way done. Dear continues in a holding pattern about future work. Katie has a 2nd interview with a company close to us. We have an open house at our son’s new office space on Tuesday. Work goes on for Dear and Andrew at our son and dil’s home with initial inspections ordered. The newlyweds are counting down the days to their honeymoon in Maui. Life goes on in the midst of waiting.

Hope you have a good week…

Chipping Campden ~ Cotswolds

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“Chipping Campden is one of the loveliest small towns in the Cotswolds and a gilded masterpiece of limestone and craftmanship. The main street curves in a shallow arc lined with a succession of ancient houses each grafted to the next but each with its own distinctive embellishments.”

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“As the name suggests (“Chipping” means market or market place from the old English “Ceping”). Chipping Campden was one of the most important of the medieval wool towns and famous throughout Europe. This legacy of fame and prosperity is everything that give the town its character.

Campden was already established in the 7th century and derives its name from the Saxon “Campa-denu” or “Campadene”, meaning a valley with fields or enclosures of cultivated land.”

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Took this shot for my chicken/egg farmer friends!

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“For many visitors, Chipping Campden is the quintessential Cotswold town. It has a variety of building styles that have survived from all ages. Chipping Campden was one of the Cotswold’s main wool markets.”

2013-09-16 Alton to Cotswolds12World War I and World War II Memorials.

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The ancient Market Hall was built in 1627 by Sir Baptist Hicks for a cost of £90.00. It was for the purpose of giving shelter to the local market selling cheese, butter and poultry – not wool as is sometimes thought.

Each corner of the building has a pediment, and each gable had a window which is now blocked up. The side arches have stone ballustrades and the floor is paved with stone.

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We really enjoyed this small market town. There was a used bookstore in town where I found an Elizabeth Goudge book.

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We also spent some time at St. James Church grounds and I’ll share those photos next along with some of it’s history.

I had a fun adventure with one of the “girls” last night and hope to share about that soon. It was a beautiful day on Wednesday here in the Seattle area.  Hope all is well where you live…

HT: Chipping Campden Tourist Information.

Lest I Forget…

…what wonderful evenings we’ve had.

 

Dear announced he was making a Valentine’s Day meal. He surprised me with the lovely tulips and card on Sunday morning and then put together a wonderful meal on Monday night with the help of our daughter Katie. Shortly after the meal the power went out because of high winds that knocked down a tree onto power lines. We were without power the rest of the evening so we gathered up some candles and got together in the living room where Katie read to us from The Bird in the Tree by Elizabeth Goudge.

 

We’ve come full circle. Now our youngest is reading to us. She said it felt so Jane Austenish…reading by candlelight.

Photobucket replaced all my photos with ugly black and grey boxes and they are holding my photos hostage until I pay them lots of money. I’m slowly going through all my posts and trying to clean them up and replacing some photos. Such a bother.

Fall Into Reading ~ 2008

It’s time to join Katrina at Callapidder Days for another round of Reading Fun starting September 22 and going till December 20th.

 

Fall is filling up with obligations on my part so I’m only going to put a few books on my Fall reading list. I’ll be reading my Bible on my quest to read every book of the Bible several times in a month before I move on to the next. I’m in the book of Mark right now. So here are the other books on my list.

Beatrix Potter -A Life of Nature ~ by Linda Lear

Father Brown Crime Stories ~ by G.K. Chesterton

Transforming Grace ~ by Jerry Bridges

The Heart of the Family ~ by Elizabeth Goudge

Green Dolphin Street ~ by Elizabeth Goudge

I might even re-read The Wind in the Willows

Happy Tea and Reading Weather to one and all. Enjoy…

For more Fall book reading lists click here.

Photobucket is holding all my photos that I posted on my blog from 2007-2015 hostage and replaced them with big black and grey boxes with threats. So discouraging…as I’m slowly trying to clean up thousands of posts!

Gentian Hill by Elizabeth Goudge

Closed Gentian, Bottle Gentian, (Gentiana andrewsii)

I just finished reading Gentian Hill by Elizabeth Goudge. I am still delighted with Goudge as an author. She developed so many interesting characters in this story.

“The story is a retelling of the legend of St. Michael’s Chapel at Torquay. Built in the thirteenth century, it was in existence until not so many years ago, and until the beginning to the nineteenth century any foreign vessels dropping anchor in Torbay, and possessing Roman Catholic crews, sent them on pilgrimages to the Chapel.”

The Village where Stella lives is now called Marldon, derived from Mergheldon, the  Hill where Gentians grow, and as I have been guilty of taking some liberties with it, I have called it Gentian Hill. ”

-Elizabeth Goudge

Some of the book is historical and the rest is imaginary. I highly recommend it and I’m including two paragraphs from the book that stood out to me.

From page 196 of Gentian Hill ~
“For a moment or two they enjoyed the delicate innuendo and elegant repartee of the art of conversation in which they had been trained, meanwhile watching, without appearing to do so, the gradual unfolding of this hour placed like a flower in their hands. For such was unconsciously the attitude of both of them towards the new phase of each new day – it was not unimportant, it had some discovery hidden within it for finding. It was the attitude of the trained mind collecting the evidence, in their case for the Christian thesis that all things, somehow, work together for good.”

And from page 208 ~
“For the first time since he had been at sea a brief thrill went through Zachary. There was a leap of joy in him, like a flame lighting up a dark lantern. At that moment he believed it was worth it. This moment of supreme beauty was worth all the wretchedness of the journey. It was always worth it. “For our light affliction which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory.” It was the central truth of existence, and all men knew it, though they might not know that they knew it. Each man followed his own star through so much pain because he knew it, and at journey’s end all the innumerable lights would glow into one.”

The following poem is not from Goudge’s book but from a Wildflower Book I own…

Fringed Gentian (Gentiana crinita)

“Finis coronet opus! Let the end crown all and the last be the best! Here is a lovely flower that often carries its beautiful and delicately fringed petals into the frosted foreground of oncoming Winter.”

Thou blossom, bright with Autumn dew,
And colored with the heaven’s own blue,
That openest when the quiet light
Succeeds the keen and frosty night;

Thou comest not when violets lean
O’er wandering brooks and springs unseen,
Or columbines, in purple dressed,
Nod o’er the ground-bird’s hidden nest.

Thou waitest late, and com’st alone,
When woods are bare and birds are flown,
And frosts and shortening days portend
The aged Year is near his end.

Then doth thy sweet and quiet eye
Look through its fringes to the sky,
Blue-blue-as if that sky let fall
A flower from it cerulean wall.

I  would that thus, when I shall see
The hour of death draw near to me,
Hope, blossoming within my heart,
May look to heaven as I depart.

Finis.

~William Cullen Bryant