Saints Peter and Paul Church ~San Francisco

For InSPIREd Sunday I decided to go to my archives to share some beautiful churches I’ve visited. When traveling I always keep an eye out for these grand old places of worship filled with history. Saints Peter and Paul Catholic Church originally served the immigrant Italian population that settled in San Francisco.

You can read some of the history of this church by clicking here. A ribbon of verse spans the facade from Dante’s “Paridiso” and translates,

“The Glory of Him who moves all things penetrates and glows throughout the universe.”

I copied the following information from Fodor’s,

“Camera-toting visitors focus their lenses on the Romanesque splendor of what’s often called the Italian Cathedral. Completed in 1924, the church has Disneyesque stone-white towers that are local landmarks. Mass reflects the neighborhood; it’s given in English, Italian, and Chinese. (This is one of the few churches in town where you can hear Mass in Italian.) Following their 1954 City Hall wedding, Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio had their wedding photos snapped here. On the first Sunday of October, a Mass followed by a parade to Fisherman’s Wharf celebrates the Blessing of the (Fishing) Fleet. Also in October is the Italian Heritage Parade in North Beach. The country’s oldest Italian celebration, it began in 1869.”

I certainly was one of those camera-toting visitors.

This stained glass window is a depiction of the wedding where Jesus performed his first miracle, changing water into wine.

Be sure to visit more churches from around the world by clicking here to the InSPIREd Sunday link up hosted by Beth and Sally.

We’ve had a busy weekend filled with gatherings and projects. Hope your Sunday finishes well.

InSPIREd Sunday ~ Oysterville

Oysterville is located on the Long Beach Peninsula on Willapa Bay in the state of Washington.

Founded along the banks of Willapa (once called Shoalwater) Bay in 1854, Oysterville’s development was directly related to the harvesting of native oysters and shipping them to San Francisco in the 1850s – 1880s.   Within the village are several surviving residences and other buildings constructed in the late 1860s and early 1870s, some of which are significant for their architectural qualities.  These are among the few remaining structures associated with one of the northwest’s earliest industries.

The Baptist church was built in 1892 on land donated by R.H. Espy, who also provided $1500 for its construction.

Regular Baptist services ceased in the 1930s and the church eventually reverted to the Espy family. In 1981 they arranged for its re-dedication as an ecumenical church and gifted the building and property to the Oysterville Restoration Foundation.

The Oysterville church is more than just the most recognizable architectural landmark of our village. Its unlocked doors allow visitors a rare reprieve from the pace of ordinary life. This is the introduction that many people have to Oysterville, and is the memory that they take home with them. Hundreds of people sign the church guest book every year-they marvel at the building, thank it for simply being here, and make a donation before moving on. The “poor box”, located in the church vestibule, has long been a reliable source of revenue, helping to pay for the historic structure’s ongoing maintenance.

The church was considered “state-of-the-art” and included a three-foot-deep, zinc-lined baptismal font under the dais. For the dedication service, the women and children of the congregation filled the font with water from a pump in the yard across the street. At the conclusion of the service it was discovered that no drain had been provided; the water had to be removed in like manner by bucket brigade. Thereafter, baptisms continued to take place at the bay.

InSPIREd Sunday is hosted by – Beth and Sally

Click over to see other inspirational architecture from around the world.

Ht: Oysterville Restoration Foundation

Sunday From the Road…

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Matthew 6:25-34

English Standard Version (ESV)

“Therefore I tell you, do not be anxious about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink, nor about your body, what you will put on. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing? Look at the birds of the air: they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they? And which of you by being anxious can add a single hour to his span of life? And why are you anxious about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they neither toil nor spin, yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these. But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which today is alive and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, will he not much more clothe you, O you of little faith? Therefore do not be anxious, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink?’ or ‘What shall we wear?’ For the Gentiles seek after all these things, and your heavenly Father knows that you need them all. But seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be added to you.

“Therefore do not be anxious about tomorrow, for tomorrow will be anxious for itself. Sufficient for the day is its own trouble.

SeaJack #6 070These verses have come to mind a lot on this 8 day road trip of ours, especially when we encountered some severe weather along the way. As I saw birds flitting about in the strongest of winds that made our car rock I thought that God was certainly watching over us, too.

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Psalm 100:4

Enter his gates with thanksgiving,
    and his courts with praise!
    Give thanks to him; bless his name!

More From the Road…

Although the eagles and mountains we saw on our roadtrip were the most majestic of our views we saw other lovely sights. This robin sat still long enough for me to capture with my lens.

The sun played nicely on and through the moss on the trees we passed along the road.

The last photos I took on this trip were of this Orthodox church in Arlington where we returned to Interstate 5 to head home. Love the design of the crosses.

What’s up for you today? We are having a meal tonight with 3 of our 5 kiddos. I’m thinking I’ll set the table with pink, red, and white…

Churches With Interesting History…

From the Great Chicago Fire to Al Capone both these Gold Coast churches have some great history.

Early Friday morning in Chicago after breakfast Dear and I visited 2 churches that were close to our hotel. The first church we visited was Holy Name Cathedral.

” Holy Name Cathedral on North State Street is both a Roman Catholic parish and the seat of the Archdiocese of Chicago. After the fire of 1871 destroyed the former Holy Name Church, Bishop Thomas Foley resolved to build a spectacular replacement. Brooklyn architect Patrick Charles Keely designed the Gothic structure, and the cornerstone was laid on July 19, 1874.”

Once inside the church, the most striking feature is the suspended Resurrection Crucifix sculpted by the artist Ivo Demetz.

“Among the many striking features inside the Cathedral are the five red, broad-brimmed, cardinals’ hats, or galeros, suspended from the ceiling. Traditionally, this symbol of a cardinal is raised to the ceiling of his cathedral upon his death. The hat hangs until it turns into dust, a reminder that all earthly glory is passing.”  You’ll need to look carefully in the upper part of my photo which is almost too dark to see the galeros.

The most famous story about Holy Name Cathedral involves a mobster gunfight that happened on Oct. 11, 1926. Gunmen hired by Al Capone were positioned across from the cathedral and killed Earl “Hymie” Weiss in a hail of gunfire, leaving a bullet wedged into the cornerstone. We saw the bullet hole but I didn’t take a photo of it.

The Fourth Presbyterian Church was the 2nd church we visited. “The name “Fourth” was selected not because it was the fourth Presbyterian church to be founded in Chicago—there had been several founded before then, with North Presbyterian being one of the earliest—but because “Fourth” was the lowest number then not in use. “ The first structure at a different location was re-dedicated on October 8, 1871 and just 2 hours after it’s evening services concluded the Great Chicago Fire swept through downtown and the Northside and destroyed it. They were at another location and then in 1912 they settled at this property on Michigan Ave.

There was no “Michigan Avenue” north of the Chicago River yet in 1912; it was to be several years before a bridge was constructed over the Chicago River to extend north the Michigan Avenue that had grown in prominence south of the river.

“The church proper (the Sanctuary) was designed by architect Ralph Adams Cram, the parish buildings around the courtyard by architect Howard Van Doren Shaw, and the stained glass windows by Charles J. Connick. The interior painting and decoration of the Sanctuary was overseen by Frederick Clay Bartlett. The new church was dedicated in 1914.”

“The North Michigan Avenue “Magnificent Mile” neighborhood literally grew up around the church, particularly after the opening of the Michigan Avenue Bridge in 1920. Except for the familiar Water Tower complex two blocks to the south, which survived the Chicago Fire of 1871, Fourth Church is now the oldest surviving structure on Michigan Avenue north of the river.”

There was so much to do and see in Chicago. You’ll be seeing a lot more posts as I organize my photos and re-visit everything I was able to fit in on my 4 full days of sight seeing. We arrived home last night and it will take me a while to get a handle on what day of the week it is. We are overcast and cool again here in the Seattle area. My sunburned scalp and nose will appreciate this weather for sure.

Since this post is full of C’s I’m linking with Teacher Jenny at Alphabe-Thursday for the letter C.

Little White Church

There’s a little white church in the valley
That stands in my memory each day
And it seems I can hear the bells now ringing
Though I am many miles away

And many times in church on Sunday morning
That whole countryside would gather there
They would all kneel down by the altar
As they lifted up their voice in prayer

   Oh the church in the valley that little white church
Is the place I love so well
Now I’m sad and lonely yes I’m sad and lonely
For that little white church in the dell

They would sing the old song Rock of Ages
Oh Christ let me hide myself in thee
And I know some of them are now waiting
Just o’er the dark and stormy sea

I know that troubles all are ended
And happy forever they will be
They are waiting and watching up yonder
For the coming home of you and me

I’m linking up with Teacher Jenny for Alphabe-Thursday. We are on the Letter W.

Port Townsend Architecture and Gardens…

Lots of photos for you and few words to go with them. I’ll just let you enjoy.

I think this was my favorite home we happened by on Saturday morning. I love the porch and the great yard.

It was interesting to see how many inns and old homes were up for sale. We wondered how people survive in out of the way locations like these, especially in this economy.

Happy Tuesday to all of you!