Postcard from San Francisco Day 2…

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Today was a full day of sight seeing with an old friend from my college days who grew up in San Francisco. She happens to be Russian/Chinese and knows the city well. We had several stops and enjoyed lunch and shopping in China Town where everyone is getting ready for the Chinese New Year. I don’t think I need to tell anyone what bridge they are looking at in my photo…

Postcard from San Francisco…

Hello from San Francisco. This photo was taken from Top of the Mark at the Mark Hopkins San Francisco. I’ll share more detail from our time here when we get back home. Uploading photos takes soooo long at the hotel!

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We put in lots of steps today to walk up to Nob Hill from our hotel. The weather was good today for us. Dear will be busy at a conference the next couple of days and I’ll be checking out the city with a friend and on my own. Hope all is well in your part of the world.

Saints Peter and Paul Church ~San Francisco

For InSPIREd Sunday I decided to go to my archives to share some beautiful churches I’ve visited. When traveling I always keep an eye out for these grand old places of worship filled with history. Saints Peter and Paul Catholic Church originally served the immigrant Italian population that settled in San Francisco.

You can read some of the history of this church by clicking here. A ribbon of verse spans the facade from Dante’s “Paridiso” and translates,

“The Glory of Him who moves all things penetrates and glows throughout the universe.”

I copied the following information from Fodor’s,

“Camera-toting visitors focus their lenses on the Romanesque splendor of what’s often called the Italian Cathedral. Completed in 1924, the church has Disneyesque stone-white towers that are local landmarks. Mass reflects the neighborhood; it’s given in English, Italian, and Chinese. (This is one of the few churches in town where you can hear Mass in Italian.) Following their 1954 City Hall wedding, Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio had their wedding photos snapped here. On the first Sunday of October, a Mass followed by a parade to Fisherman’s Wharf celebrates the Blessing of the (Fishing) Fleet. Also in October is the Italian Heritage Parade in North Beach. The country’s oldest Italian celebration, it began in 1869.”

I certainly was one of those camera-toting visitors.

This stained glass window is a depiction of the wedding where Jesus performed his first miracle, changing water into wine.

Be sure to visit more churches from around the world by clicking here to the InSPIREd Sunday link up hosted by Beth and Sally.

We’ve had a busy weekend filled with gatherings and projects. Hope your Sunday finishes well.

San Francisco ~ Saints Peter and Paul Church

There was so much to share from my extended weekend in San Francisco in December and then Christmas took over as it should. Now that life is a little slower I’ll share another beautiful church I visited.

The present church, with its twin lofty spires that soar 191 feet into the sky, was completed in 1924. For over a century, the church of SS. Peter and Paul has served parishioners, charmed the numerous tourists who visit it daily, and has been an inspiration to the members of the North Beach community. A ribbon of verse from Dante’s “Paradiso” spans the facade and translates:

 “The glory of Him who moves all things
penetrates and glows throughout the universe.”

This mosaic inscription placed just above the three entrances to the church connects the four large pillars upon which rest the symbols of the four Evangelists: Matthew (An angel), Mark (A lion), Luke (An ox) and John (An eagle). Original plans, regrettably laid away to rest, called for spectacular outdoor mosaics covering the entire facade. The twin spires (191 feet) have become a landmark in the area. The church is 100 feet wide and 160 feet long. The magnificent rose window measures fourteen feet in diameter.

 

Photobucket is holding all my photos from 2007 to 2015 hostage and has replaced them all with ugly black and grey boxes asking for a ransom to have them re-published. Such a frustrating bother as I go through each post to delete the ugly boxes.

ABC Wednesday ~ X is for…

X is for Χριστός

 

Chi Rho () are the first two letters in the Greek spelling of the word Christ ( Greek : “Χριστός” ), and so have come to be used for a number of Christian-related usages.

The Chi Rho is one of the earliest cruciform symbols used by Christians. It is formed by superimposing the first two letters of the word “Christ” in Greek, chi = ch and rho = r. Although not technically a cross, the Chi Rho invokes the crucifixion of Jesus as well as symbolizing his status as the Christ. There is early evidence of the Chi Rho symbol on Christian Rings of the third century (200’s). There is also importantly Constantine’s use of it on the labarum, the imperial standard, in the early 4th century. Lactantius, a 4th century Christian apologist, reports that on the eve of the Battle of the Milvian Bridge in 312, Constantine had a vision of God in which he was commanded to mark his men’s shields with the Chi Rho symbol. After Constantine’s success at the Milvian bridge, the Chi Rho became the official imperial insignia. Archaeologists have uncovered evidence demonstrating that the Chi Rho was emblazoned on the helmet and shield of Constantine as well as those of all of his soldiers. Coins and medallions minted during Constantine’s reign also bore the Chi Rho. By the year 350, the Chi Rho began to be used on Christian sarcophagi and frescoes.

I took these photos of these murals inside the historic Grace Cathedral in San Francisco, California. The Cathedral was amazing and I have a full post about it with more photos of the inside and outside here and here. If you ever get the chance to visit San Francisco make sure and put this Cathedral on your must see list!

 

When walking in the Pacific Heights neighborhood in San Francisco I spotted the symbol again above this door. This building probably use to be connected with a church but it appears to have been converted to a home now. Here’s another view of this amazing building.

For more ABC Wednesday visit the ABC Blog  hosted by Mrs. Nesbitt!

Photobucket is holding all my photos from 2007 to 2015 hostage and has replaced them all with ugly black and grey boxes asking for a ransom to have them re-published. Such a frustrating bother as I go through each post to delete the ugly boxes.

San Francisco ~ Haas-Lilienthal Victorian House

ABC Wednesday ~ V is for Victorian

As featured on A&E’s America’s Castles’ “Castles by the Bay,” this exuberant Queen Anne-style Victorian was built in 1886. It is the only intact private home of the period that is open regularly as a museum, complete with authentic furniture and artifacts. The House has elaborate wooden gables, a circular corner tower and luxuriant ornamentation. Volunteer docents lead tours through the House and explain the Victorian architecture of the exterior. A display of photographs in the downstairs supper-room describes the history of the home and the family that lived here until 1972.

The Haas-Lilienthal Family
From Victorian Sampler by Randolph Delahanty.
William Haas was born April 24, 1849, in the village of Reckendorf, Bavaria, to a family of modest means with many children…In 1865, sixteen-year-old William and an older brother, Abraham, sailed for New York City…He arrived in San Francisco on October 9, 1868, and joined the grocery firm of Leopold Loupe and Kalman Haas. His first recorded address, in Langley’s San Francisco Directory of 1869, was the Nucleus Hotel, on Third and Market. Please come take a tour to learn more about how William Haas built his life (and his home) in San Francisco.

William Haas entrusted Bavarian architect Peter R. Schmidt and contractors McCann & Biddell to build his home in 1886.

The house withstood the 1906 Earthquake with only slight damage. However, the home was threatened by the devastating fire, which followed the earthquake and destroyed about 40% of San Francisco. The Haas family watched the fire from the roof of their house, but was soon forced to evacuate by city authorities. So the family, along with most other San Francisco residents, went to the nearest public park, Lafayette Park, to camp out during the emergency. Later, they temporarily moved to a large house in Oakland while the City was reconstructed.

My husband was at a conference in San Francisco December 5th -9th. I met him there on saturday the 6th of December to celebrate our 34th wedding anniversary. On Sunday we went on a walking tour of some of the Victorian Homes in Pacific Heights. When we got to this home a lovely volunteer with the Foundation, Kaleene, told us about the Christmas Open House that was that very afternoon. Dear had to go to a meeting but I came back to the house for the event. While there I was given a mini-tour of the home. Here are some interior photos of this historic landmark.

 

Wine and food was served during the Open House.

Being Russian I was happy to see this great Samovar…

For more ABC Wednesday Posts visit the ABC Wednesday Blog. Thanks to Denise for hosting this meme.

Photobucket is holding all my photos from 2007 to 2015 hostage and has replaced them all with ugly black and grey boxes asking for a ransom to have them re-published. Such a frustrating bother as I go through each post to delete the ugly boxes.

San Francisco Landmarks

 

Alcatraz, Ghirardelli, Lombard St., and the Golden Gate Bridge.

 

Fisherman’s Wharf and the Bay Bridge.

Photobucket is holding all my photos from 2007 to 2015 hostage and has replaced them all with ugly black and grey boxes asking for a ransom to have them re-published. Such a frustrating bother as I go through each post to delete the ugly boxes.

San Francisco ~ Inside Grace Cathedral

The pipes to the Aeolian-Skinner Organ, the only one of it’s kind west of Chicago, heard in over 400 services and concerts each year.

Chapel of Grace, the oldest part of the cathedral features Connick windows, a 14th century Flemish altarpiece, and Lewis Hobart design.

 

The church is lined with different murals painted by renowned artists such as Antonio Sotomayor and John de Rosen. “Centennial Mural” shows the 1906 earthquake and the fire that destroyed the city, including Grace Church.

 

Photobucket is holding all my photos from 2007 to 2015 hostage and has replaced them all with ugly black and grey boxes asking for a ransom to have them re-published. Such a frustrating bother.

 

San Francisco ~ Grace Cathedral

 

Today I’m sharing my outside shots of Grace Cathedral. I will show my inside shots later.

Grace Cathedral is descended from the historic Grace Church, built in the Gold Rush year of 1849, and the imposing structure on the corner of California and Stockton streets that was destroyed in the 1906 earthquake and fire. San Francisco’s Crocker family gave their Nob Hill porperty, destroyed by the fire, for the building of a new cathedral.

Work began on this structure in 1928. Designed in the French Gothic style by Lewis Hobart, it was completed in 1964.

Famed for its Ghiberti doors, labyrinths, stained glass, the cathedral has become an internationally-known place of pilgrimage.

The Doors of Paradise are considered by many to be the first and greatest masterpiece of Italian Renaissance. The magnum opus of Florentine sculptor Lorenzo Ghiberti (1378-1455), the doors were made for the Baptistery of Florence Cathedral (the Duomo) and told the story of the Old and New Testaments. Grace Cathedral’s doors were made from the same molds – which were later destroyed – used for the originals.

 

I was also impressed with several of the other doors into the cathedral and wanted to show you them, too.

 

One of my special treats the day I visited the Cathedral was a small orchestra practicing for a Christmas concert. It was just so beautiful to walk around the inside of the cathedral being serenaded with beautiful music that inspired me to praise God for all the wonder available to us…

Photobucket is holding all my photos from 2007 to 2015 hostage and has replaced them all with ugly black and grey boxes asking for a ransom to have them re-published. Such a frustrating bother.

San Francisco ~ Pacific Heights

Queen Anne homes dominated Victorian residential architecture from 1880 to 1910. In fact, this style is virtually synonymous with the phrase “Victorian house.” Typical characteristics of a Queen Anne home include projecting bay windows, wraparound porches, towers, turrets, balconies, elaborate banisters and spindles, stained glass, decorative trim, and patterned shingles.

On Sunday Dear and I walked around the Pacific Heights area of San Francisco to see these great Victorian Homes. We saw other styles of grand houses, also.

This yellow and green house are on Gough street. The Victorians on this block, all built in 1889, are particularly lovely. These are in the Queen Anne Style. I believe they refer to the yellow one being a Queen Anne-Eastlake style (marked by elaborate woodwork).

This was a smaller house tucked between two larger structures that just caught my eye.

This is the Spreckels Mansion. Romance novelist Danielle Steel’s home is one of the most extravagant in town – built in 1913 for Adolph Spreckels, heir to the sugar empire of German-American industrialist Claus Spreckels, who made his fortune refining California sugar beets and Hawaii sugarcane.

 

This is the home featured in the Robin William’s movie Mrs. Doubtfire.

I really enjoyed seeing this old church and all the people coming out of services.

This is the Haas-Lilienthal House built in 1886. The exciting thing about this house is that we stumbled upon it on their annual Christmas open house day. We met one of the Foundation workers out front who told us about the open house and invited us to come back when it started. I will be posting more about this great house and the indoor pictures I was able to take also.

Photobucket is holding all my photos from 2007 to 2015 hostage and has replaced them all with ugly black and grey boxes asking for a ransom to have them re-published. Such a frustrating bother.