The First Noel ~

The First Noel

The First Noel is unknown in origin but is generally thought to be English dating back to the sixteenth century. There is a misconception that the First Noel was French and it is believed that this is because of the French spelling of Noel as opposed to the olde English Anglo-Saxon spelling of the word as in Nowell. After England was captured by the Normans numerous words were adopted from the Norman French language and Noel was re-spelt as Nowell, early printed versions of this carol use the Nowell spelling. The First Noel was first published in 1833 when it appeared in “Christmas Carols Ancient and Modern,” a collection of seasonal carols gathered by William B. Sandys.

 

Hoping you experience the love of God today and everyday!

Photobucket replaced all my photos with ugly black and grey boxes and they are holding my photos hostage until I pay them lots of money. I’m slowly going through all my posts and trying to clean them up and replacing some photos. Such a bother.

7 thoughts on “The First Noel ~

  1. I do remember that this carol used to be spelled ‘Nowell’! Not so sure that the shepherd’s already saw the star, but it did guide the Wise Men. Sometimes poets take poetic license, lol, to make things rhyme and fit the meter. I love the chorus and we do sing the whole carol often at the nursing home. Blessings and have a great Lord’s Day!

  2. I’ve been enjoying really paying attention to the words of carols and hymns recently. And being reminded of the history behind some of them is so cool. Hope your week is grand Ellen! Blessings of His best to you and yours!

  3. Learning a new arrangement (and singing it as an alto) of “The First Noel” has helped me to refocus on the words, too. I love it that there were some who weren’t seeking the King, but found Him (the shepherds) as well as those who were seeking Him (the wise men).

  4. I love the carols and the history of the ancient ones. I like the ancient carols best, imagining those Christians of old singing them together. Thanks for sharing this bit of history.

    Jody

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