Japanese Tea ~ Matcha and Katie’s Yukata

Here is the second guest post from my daughter Katie. She has included photos of her Yukata and a little description of the type of tea used in her Art of Japanese Tea classes.

“I finally received my yukata! Here are some pictures of me wearing it down at the arboretum. Don’t judge my obi tying too harshly, this was the first week that I dressed myself without help from my friend Mika or my teacher.

 

 

In the class we have now done the full procedure for taking a sweet from a bowl with chopsticks several times, have begun doing the full procedure for taking tea, and just started practicing the procedures for purifying all the implements before whisking tea. I got complimented by some of my peers and by my teacher for my tea-whisking skill. 🙂 The tea we use is matcha, which is powdered green tea. It’s…an acquired taste, but I think I’m starting to like it. Mika insists that it is addictive. I guess I just don’t have an addictive personality, haha.”

Thank you so much Katie!

For more posts on Favorite Teas click over to Gracious Hospitality.

Photobucket is holding all my photos from 2007-2015 hostage and they have blacked them all out. I’m slowly working at restoring my posts without their help. Such a tiresome bother!

20 thoughts on “Japanese Tea ~ Matcha and Katie’s Yukata

  1. Okay, I think that bow is pretty darn good. Can’t wait to see it when you have the technique perfected. Very interesting indeed.

  2. Thank you to Katie for a perfect post! I’m enjoying learning of her Japanese Tea Ceremony lessons VERY much! Besides all the great knowledge and learning she’s sharing with us — I appreciate that she’s willing to share pictures of herself in her proper Japanese attire. What a cutie she is!

    I loved this post!!!!!

    LaTeaDah

  3. Katie, I’m enjoying your posts about your class. I love the colors of the yukata. It looks so cute on you! I hope you acquire the taste for the tea! That would be a bummer if you learned all this and didn’t enjoy the tea!

  4. I just learned about a new tea and your classes sound like a dream! I will investigate the green tea that you wisk! Thank you so much for showing something new me! Your gown and tie look very nice.

  5. Beautiful post by beautiful Katie. Thanks for introducing us to something new. I hope you’ll teach your mom about the tea ceremony and she can teach me!

  6. Good morning, Ellen!

    Thanks for leaving the comment on my blog and sharing about your big storage unit. You must miss seeing and enjoying your goodies. Yes, I am curious to see what finds you will encounter when you go back to Seattle.

    I gather you like white dishes trimmed with gold. I do too although I don’t have very many. I think white with gold looks so classy!

    And yes, I do like history a lot, especially “old” history! 🙂

  7. Hi Ellen and Katie,
    I love Matcha Green Tea… have you tried it with a dried plum as a sweetener? Really delicious. Your Yukata is just darling!

  8. Oh you look lovely! And I’m sure that your tea whisking skills are top notch. I wish that we could see you in action. LOL!

  9. Ellen,
    what kind of class is your daughter participating in and is it held in Japan or the US?
    Chanoyu, the Japanese Tea Ceremony, is a subject that requires many years of study & practice. It’s as much a spiritual exercise as it is a tea ceremony in a more traditional sense. I think your daughter Katie might enjoy reading an article on the origins of Chanoyu that Aaron Fisher has recently published in his online magazine The Leaf titled Exploring the Tea Masters of Japan Part 1, Murata Juko.

    Jo
    Ya-Ya House of Excellent Teas

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