Nadia’s (Mom’s) Kulich / Paska

 

What many of you call Paska we called Kulich growing up. This is my mom’s Russian Easter Bread Recipe that I quartered because the amount she would make is quite daunting for me. We have cut it in half in years past. Now what you need to know about my mom and recipes is that she ends up tweaking them from year to year so this recipe is for her Kulich from 2001. I have a 2009 and 2012 recipe, too. This one was easier to quarter. Here’s the link to the original. My dear mom passed away from this earth in September of 2013 so I cherish her tweaked recipes.

Ingredients:

2 pkgs rapid rise yeast
1/4 cup lukewarm water
1/4 cup lukewarm milk
1 teaspoon sugar

4 egg yolks
1 egg
1-1/4 cups sugar
3/4 cup butter
1 cup whipping cream
1 cup half and half
1/2 ounce apricot brandy
1-1/2 teaspoons powdered vanilla
1 teaspoon salt
Zest of half a lemon
About 2-1/2 lbs of flour, sifted (about 7 cups)
Vegetable oil to coat the rising dough

6 to 7 one pound or two pound cans for baking. You can use loaf pans or large muffin tins if you don’t have the cans to bake them in.

Add yeast to the lukewarm water and milk and sugar in a stainless steel bowl. Make sure the liquids are lukewarm. Let this mixture dissolve and sit.

Beat the egg yolks and egg together.
Cream the butter and sugar in the large bowl of a stand-up mixer.
Add the eggs to the butter and sugar mixture slowly mixing to combine and then beat to incorporate well.
Mix the half and half with the whipping cream and heat until lukewarm, not hot, and slowly incorporate into the creamed mixture.
Mix in the vanilla and brandy.
Add the yeast mixture and the salt and beat with a mixer.
Continue beating and add the lemon zest.
Continue beating and add the sifted flour about a cup at a time.
Once you cannot beat the dough any longer using the mixer, put the dough on a floured surface and start incorporating the remaining flour by kneading the dough.
The dough should be kneaded very well, approximately 10 minutes.
You should knead the dough until you can cut it with a knife and it is smooth without any holes.
Place the dough in a stainless steel bowl. Take some oil and pour a little on the dough and spread it all over the dough. Make sure to turn the dough so it is coated evenly.
Cover with plastic wrap right on the dough and a dish towel on top of that.
Place in a warm place away from drafts to rise. (My sister usually puts it into the oven that has been warmed slightly.

It is now time to prepare the coffee cans (1 lb. and 2 lb. cans are the best) Cut circles the size of the bottom of the cans out of wax paper. You will need four circles per can. Make sure the cans are well greased. Put the 4 circles in the bottom of the cans.

 

Use a empty and clean coffee can like the ones above. If there is a label make sure to take it off. If the can has a lip at the top you’ll need to use a can opener to cut the lip off the can. I hope these pictures will make the process easier to understand.

Cut sheets of wax paper long enough to line the sides of the can and tall enough to be 2″ above the rim of the can. Use Crisco to seal the ends of the paper.

Here’s a can with the bottom and sides lined with the wax paper.

When the dough has doubled in size, punch it down and turn it over.
Let it rise a second time until it doubles in size. Punch it down again.
Now the dough is ready to put into the prepared cans.
You will take a portion of dough about 1/3 the size of the can. Knead it and form it into a smooth ball that you can easily drop into the can.

Let the dough rise again inside the can until it is at least double in size.

 

Bake in a 350 degree oven until golden brown on top.(approximately 30 minutes or more depending on your oven.)

Let them cool slightly in the cans. Remove them from the cans and then cool completely standing up. Some people cool them on their sides turning them often to keep their shape. We found this time that they cool just fine and keep their shape standing up so we didn’t bother with that step!

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To go with this bread my mom always makes a wonderful sweet cheese topping that is formed in a mold in different shapes. For my mom’s Sernaya Paska (cheese spread) recipe click here.

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I’ll be trying this Kulich/Paska recipe quartered at the end of this week. I’ll let you know how it goes and how many coffee can shaped loaves it makes. We got seven loaves out of this recipe although we shorted some of the cans.

 

Are you preparing for Easter?

About Ellenhttp://I am a wife, mother, baba (grandmother) and a loyal friend. Jesus is my King and my hope is in my future with Him.

11 thoughts on “Nadia’s (Mom’s) Kulich / Paska

  1. What a beautiful bread and I know it tastes even better than it looks. How fun to bake it in coffee cans and how pretty it comes out. We will have traditional ham dinner with family and am on my way to the groc store today for …supplies.:)
    Have a wonderful Easter, dear heart.

  2. Just wanted to let you know that last year we did not cover and roll the kulich. We just let them stand up and cool and they were fine. Love you and have a wonderful Easter.

  3. Beautiful Ellen….nothing as sweet as the memories of our dear moms in the kitchen. I’m sure this recipe brings a few tears and much joy as you remember your mom. Easter Blessings to you and your dear family.

  4. Tweeked recipes by your mom are the best! Thanks for this great tutorial Ellen! I must make this sometime. Today, I made Lovella’s paska recipe – not perfect but still tasty! Your loaf is just beautiful with all the trimmings – even sweeter are the memories of your dear mum! Happy Easter dear Ellen!

  5. Everything’s coming up paska today! I baked another batch…sent some home with the kids and grands…and now I’m wondering if I need to make more tomorrow.

    Love your beautifully decorated Easter bread!

  6. Your Easter bread looks delicious! Recipes passed down like this are precious. I was talking to my mum last night and when I said ‘Easter’ she said ‘I’ll make enough Easter Bread to send you a parcel’. So poignant, as Mum can’t even make a cup of tea anymore, but I have her recipe and the tradition can continue. I think that this is what she would find important.

  7. I love this and the memory of my mom making her paska in tins too! Like Pondside said, recipes like this, with all the memories associated with them, are precious.

  8. I have wondered if Kulich and Paska were one and the same. I suppose that there is an endless variety of recipes. I hope to be baking tomorrow afternoon. I love the presentation of the bread using coffee tins. It is quite the chore, yet it is so very worth it!

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